program

Below is the current program for the 2023 In Vitro Biology Meeting.

Items with an asterisk (*) are scheduled for inclusion as part of the On-Demand Limited Access
This program is subject to change​

Saturday, June 10

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12:00 PM – 5:00 PM

PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOP

Principles and Best Practices for Plant Genome Engineering Workshop*

Conveners: Piero Barone, Corteva Agriscience; Ayman Eid, University of Maryland; Bill Gordon-Kamm, Corteva Agriscience; Heidi Kaeppler, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Keunsub Lee, Iowa State University; Gen Li , University of Maryland; Wayne Parrott, University of Georgia; Yiping Qi, University of Maryland; Nigel Taylor, Danforth Plant Science Center; Joyce Van Eck, The Boyce Thompson Institute; and Veena Veena, Danforth Plant Science Center

Despite its usefulness, genome editing is not always easy to implement, especially when there are crop-specific considerations. A critical part of genome engineering is first mastering the methods for plant tissue culture and transformation. Therefore, the first half of this workshop will cover the best practices for these critical steps. We will address how to increase success for working with established systems and how to develop systems for new species. The PlantGENE Steering Committee will lead the discussion, with workshop attendees being strongly encouraged to share their knowledge. Prior to the workshop, a survey will be sent to solicit ideas for discussion items that are of the greatest interest to attendees.

The second half will focus on using state-of-the-art CRISPR genome engineering tools in plants. It will start with design, construction, and application of multiplexed CRISPR-Cas9 and base editing systems. Next the focus will shift to the design, construction, and application of CRISPR-Combo systems to boost plant genome editing through simultaneous gene activation. These presentations will cover the backgrounds and principles of the technologies, with details provided on vector design and construction, optional assessment in protoplasts, and analysis of transformed protoplasts and stable lines for identification of edited events. All the vectors, analysis tools, and data sets used in the workshop are publicly available.

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8:30 PM – 10:00 PM

PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOP

Design of Experiments Workshop*

Conveners: Randall P. Niedz, USDA, and Uyen Cao Chu, Corteva Agriscience

Sunday, June 11

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8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

PLENARY SYMPOSIUM

Diversity in Science*

Conveners: Veena Veena, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Alison Songstad, NanoString Technologies, Inc., and Jasmyn Hoeger, University of Iowa

Speakers:
Introduction
Veena Veena, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
Women in STEM: Advice I Would Give My Younger Self
Allison Songstad
, NanoString Technologies, Inc.
Experiences in STEM from a Non-traditional Farming Background
Jasmyn Hoeger, University of Iowa
Seminar from DEI Expert
Amber Maynard
, Corteva Agriscience

This session will focus on diversity and inclusion in the STEM workspace and education environments. A panel of speakers will share their experiences in these environments and provide advice and resources to help bring awareness to diversity and inclusion in STEM. The session will conclude with an open Q&A forum to digest the discussed topics.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

Fostering Crop Resilience through Biotech, Breeding, Sensory Biology to Adapt to Changing Ecosystems

Conveners: Heqiang Huo, University of Florida, Christopher Bagley, Inari, Veena Veena, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, and Huixia Wu, Ball Horticultural Company

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

Organoid Modeling of Complex Systems: From Novel to Necessity*

Conveners: Michael K. Dame, University of Michigan Medical School, and Durga Attili, University of Michigan Medical School

Speaker:
TBD
Tristan Frum
, University of Michigan Medical School
Pig Outside a Pig – Disease Modelling and Welfare
Matheus de Oliveira Costa
, University of Saskatchewan

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

Orphan Crops in Underserved Regions

Conveners: Todd Jones, Corteva Agriculture, and Brigitte Weston, Gates Ag One

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12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

EDUCATION WORKSHOP

Effectively Communicating Research to the Non-Scientific Community

Conveners: Jasmyn M. Hoeger, University of Iowa, and Christina Yevtushenko, McGill University

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1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

Advances in Micropropagation Including Specialty Crops

Conveners: Micah E. Stevens, Sierra Gold Nurseries, and Pamela Vogel, Pairwise

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

Chemoprevention

Conveners: Brad L. Upham, Michigan State University and Michael J. Fay, Midwestern University

Speaker:
Aspects of Nrf2-Keap1 Signaling in the Actions of Some Fffective Chemopreventive Agents
Thomas W. Kensler, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center

PLANT CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

Plant Biotechnology Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition

Moderator: Ahmad Omar, University of Florida

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3:15 PM - 5:30 PM

KEYNOTE SYMPOSIUM

Opening Ceremony and Keynote Symposium*

Bioengineering: Realizing the Promise of Cell Signaling Control in Health and Disease

Keynote Speaker:
Princess I. Imoukhuede, Hunter and Dorothy Simpson Endowed Chair and Professor in Bioengineering at University of Washington

Princess Imoukhuede is the Hunter and Dorothy Simpson Endowed Chair and Professor in Bioengineering at University of Washington and a leader in systems biology research, engineering education, and academic diversity initiatives. She was an associate professor of Biomedical Engineering at Washington University (WU) in St. Louis, where she served as the Director of Diversity Initiatives for the McKelvey School of Engineering. Before joining WU, she was recognized with a Distinguished Promotion Award to Associate Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. She earned her SB in Chemical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and pursued graduate study in Bioengineering at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) where she was the first Black woman awarded a Bioengineering PhD and was only the second Black woman to earn a PhD from Caltech’s Division of Engineering and Applied Science. She completed her Postdoctoral Fellowship in Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins where she earned the prestigious United Negro College Fund/Merck Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. Her collaborative research efforts are impactful and productive with 170 conference proceedings and peer reviewed manuscripts, over 70 invited lectures, 1 patent, and 2 recently filed provisional patents. She has earned numerous awards, including the 2017 NSF CAREER Award, 2018 IMSA Distinguished Leadership Award, 2018 Young Innovator in Nanobiotechnology, 2019 AIChE Journal Futures Series, and 2020 University of Pittsburgh Graduate Women in Engineering Network High Impact Innovation and Inspiration Award. She is a Fellow of both the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the Biomedical Engineering Society, and in 2020, she was named one of the 1,000 “inspiring Black scientists” by Cell Mentor. Her lab pioneers both quantitative biological measurements and computational biological models to delineate signal transduction directing vascular signaling and analyzing oxytocin receptor variants with translational implications to cancers and cardiovascular diseases and women’s health.

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7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM

Basics of Gene Editing Using CRISPR Technology*

Conveners: Jasmyn M. Hoeger, University of Iowa, and Christina Yevtushenko, McGill University

Monday, June 12

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8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

PLENARY SYMPOSIUM

Michael E. Horn Emerging Technologies Symposium: Research to Market – In Vitro Biology Product Development*

Conveners: Allan R. Wenck, Syngenta Crop Protection, Muneeb Hassan Hashmi, Nigde Omer Halidemir University, Kenneth Kandaras, International Foundation for Ethical Research, and John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

Fish Cell Culture

Conveners: Vivian R. Dayeh, University of Waterloo, and Georgina Dowd, Plant and Food Research New Zealand

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

Innovative Approaches for Plant Gene & Editing Delivery*

Conveners: Matthew R. Willmann, Pairwise, and Raj Deepika Chauhan, Pairwise

Speakers:
Jack Wang, North Carolina State University
Zhenghe Li, Zhejiang University

Making transgenic and gene-edited plants typically involves delivery of DNA to cells using one of three standard methods—Agrobacterium, particle bombardment, or protoplast permeabilization—followed by selection and regeneration of stable transgenics in tissue culture to yield full plants with shoots and roots. As good as these approaches can be, researchers continue to work to develop alternative DNA-delivery methods to improve transformation efficiencies, eliminate or reduce the need for tissue culture, and/or allow for genotype-independent transformation. The advent of gene editing has also created a need for novel delivery methods, particularly for clonally propagated plants, that enable transgene-free editing. In this session, the invited speakers will share their experiences developing innovative approaches for gene and editing tool delivery to plant cells. The topics covered include in planta delivery of transgenes without tissue culture, DNA-free delivery of CRISPR editing tools to protoplasts using ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs), and RNA-based delivery of Cas and gRNAs using plant RNA viruses.

PLANT CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

Plant Biotechnology Student Oral Presentation Competition

Moderator: TBD

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1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

ANIMAL CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

IVACS Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition

Moderator: Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University and Kolla Kristjansdottir, Midwestern University

The In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences Section (IVACS) of the Society for In Vitro Biology is pleased to announce the 2023 Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition during the SIVB Annual meeting in Norfolk, VA. This competition encourages the exchange of scientific information between the presenters, attendees and judges. Additionally, it provides an invaluable opportunity for students and post-docs to practice and improve their presentation delivery and public speaking skills. Students and post-docs who wish to participate in this competition should check that option during the submission of their abstract to the 2023 SIVB Annual meeting. Applicants should also e-mail a copy of their complete abstract and submission ID number to the session moderators, Dr. Addy Alt-Holland (addy.alt_holland@tufts.edu) and Dr. Kolla Kristjansdottir (kkrist@midwestern.edu). The top three finalists will be selected for this competition based on the quality of their abstracts, as well as the merit of their research and scientific findings. The text of the abstract should include the following sections: Background, Objectives, Methods, Results, Discussion and Conclusions. Where appropriate, the Methods section should include relevant statistical analysis. The abstract text should not exceed 1800 characters, and should not include references. The oral presentations will be presented in-person at the meeting and a panel of expert judges will select the top presentation. Evaluation criteria will include experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, professionalism, the ability of the finalist to explain the research and answer questions, and importantly, adherence to the allocated time for the presentation. The Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition session serves to recognize and reward the research and achievements of outstanding students and post-docs. The three finalists will be presented with a certificate and a cash award during the 2023 SIVB Annual Meeting. The DEADLINE for abstract submission for the Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition is January 31, 2023. Should you have any questions, please contact the SIVB Office or the session moderators. We are looking forward to reviewing your abstract!

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3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

Artificial Seeds

Convener: Lorena Moeller, Bayer Cropscience

JOINT SYMPOSIUM

Biotechnology for Sustainability*

Conveners: Sukhpreet Sandhu, HM Clause, and Vivian R. Dayeh, University of Waterloo

EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM

Student Non-competitive Oral Presentation Session

Conveners: Jasmyn M. Hoeger, University of Iowa, and Christina Yevtushenko, McGill University

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5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

ANIMAL CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

IVACS Contributed Paper Session

Moderator: TBD

PLANT CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

Biotechnology Plant Contributed Paper Session

Moderator: Nagesh Sardesai, Corteva Agriscience

PLANT CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

Plant Contributed Paper Session

Moderator: Pamela Vogel, Pairwise

Tuesday, June 13

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8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

PLENARY SYMPOSIUM

Microbiome – Basic Science to Application*

Conveners: Kristina Martinez-Guryn, Midwestern University and Bin Tian, Syngenta Crop Protection

Speakers:
Tim A. McAllister, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
The Second Century of Phytobiome Research
Carolee T. Bull, Penn State University
The Host-Microbiome Interactome: Discovery Inferred from Systems Biology
Tor Savidge, Baylor College of Medicine

Microorganisms are integral members of environmental and organismal ecosystems that are capable of mediating interconnectedness between soil, plants, livestock, and humans with the potential to influence health. The goal of this plenary session “Microbiomes at the Intersection of One Health” is to offer a comprehensive overview of a wide range of microbes or microbiomes that mediate such links and that significantly impact plant, animal, and human health. These interactions will be illustrated through three presentations given by leaders in the fields of environmental microbiology and plant pathology, rumen microbiology and antibiotic resistance and finally human pathogen infection. Together, these presentations are expected to highlight how distinct microbiomes are inter-related and contribute health outcomes amongst plants, animals and humans.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

Advances in Biotechnology and Their Applications in Invertebrate Cell Culture*

Conveners: Shirley A. Pomponi, Florida Atlantic University, and Cynthia L. Goodman, CryoCrate, LLC

Speakers:
Shirley A. Pomponi, Florida Atlantic University
Alison M. Gardell
, University of Washington
Eleana Manousiouthakis
, University of Florida
Subba R. Palli, University of Kentucky

Invertebrate cell cultures serve as invaluable tools in pharmaceutical, environmental and agricultural research programs, including in the development of highly beneficial products.  Marine invertebrate cell cultures are intimately involved in the discovery and isolation of unique medical components, as well as provide insights into ecological disturbances.  Insect cell cultures play an effective role in insecticide discovery programs in both screening assays and mode of action studies. In all cases, in vitro methodologies are constantly being upgraded to enhance the performance of these cell culture-based assays.  Our symposium will highlight some of the state-of-the-art methodologies involved in these advances, including 3D cell culture, single cell sequencing and other related molecular techniques. In the marine biology arena, one speaker will highlight how advances in sponge cell biotechnology are leading to the development of novel drugs.  Another presenter will outline the harnessing of invertebrate cells in ecotoxicity studies to determine the impact of specific pollutants on the marine ecosystem.  For the agricultural focus, our speakers will discuss the use of primary cultures from insect digestive tissues as model systems for both targeting insecticides as well understanding basic invertebrate biology.  We will follow up the presentations with a panel discussion to better integrate and synthesize the ideas brought forward by our speakers, as well as to broaden the scope of application and summarize key points.

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

Plant Metabolomics

Convener: Qingchun Shi, Pairwise

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

Unlocking Efficiencies for Production Laboratories (Media Prep & Workplace Design, Ergonomics, Best Practices)

Conveners: Micah E. Stevens, Sierra Gold Nurseries, and Peizhen Yang, Bayer Cropscience

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3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

Cannabis Biotechnology

Conveners: Max Jones, University of Guelph

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

Designing In Vitro Assays That Are Predictive of In Vivo Activity: A Focus on Development of Prediction Models*

Conveners: John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting, and Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University Student Convener: Jasmyn M. Hoeger, University of Iowa

Speaker:
John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting

Over the past several decades, there has been a marked increase in the number and complexity of cell and tissue-based bioassays being applied to a wide range of regulatory, developmental and safety applications. Examples include the federal agencies move to adverse outcome pathways in cultured human cells, 3D human tissue constructs and human iPSC-derived cell and tissue model systems. The protocols range from simple cytotoxicity assays to more refined systems for the prediction of hazard to complex systems that incorporate exposure kinetics and endpoint-specific measures to address risk. In this context, risk is defined as the demonstrated potential for an adverse outcome from an exposure. In vitro mutagenicity assays might be seen as predictors of hazard, rather than risk, since in vivo exposure is not modeled. Tissue construct models for predicting skin or eye irritation do incorporate exposure kinetics and so hold the promise of predicting risk (i.e., degree of irritation). This symposium will focus on test methods that are designed to predict hazard or risk, highlighting test guidelines falling under the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) international program. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of quantitative predictions models that are used to translate the in vitro results into an in vivo prediction of hazard or risk. The prediction model is a key element in assay validation, and is predicated on establishing the reproducibility of the assay over time. Additionally, the test systems and assay endpoints should have mechanistic relevance in vivo. The discussion will include the importance of the prediction models developed with reference chemicals of known activity in vivo and the use of representative reference chemicals from different chemical classes and physical forms (solid/liquid) will be discussed. Presentations will address the historical drivers for the development of “modern” prediction models and real world experiences in building assay systems and resulting prediction models for regulatory applications.

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

Novel Transformation Technologies

Conveners: Yurong Chen, Bayer U. S. – Crop Science, Heidi F. Kaeppler, University of Wisconsin, and M. Annie Saltarikos, Bayer U. S. – Crop Science

Wednesday, June 14

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8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

PLENARY SYMPOSIUM

Frontiers in Spatial and Single Cell Genomics*

Conveners: William Gordon-Kamm, Corteva Agriscience, Todd Jones, Corteva Agriscience, and Debora Esposito, North Carolina State University

Working with cell/tissue cultures within a tightly controlled environment sounds simple. However, as every in vitro biologist knows, growth and morphogenic responses are complex, making genetic and/or epigenetic studies difficult to interpret. As an adjunct to whole tissue RNA sequencing analysis, single-cell RNA-sequencing and spatial transcriptomics technologies enable the study of high-resolution transcriptional activity as an aide in illuminating patterns otherwise masked by whole-tissue complexity. Such techniques have been pioneered in mammalian research but are increasingly being used effectively in plant research. Examples of single-cell and spatial transcriptome analysis will be provided illustrating the advantages of increased spatial resolution in understanding gene expression.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

Biotransformation, Open Cell Systems and Use of Cell Cultures

Conveners: J. Pon Samuel, Corteva Agriscience

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

New Breeding Technologies and Traditional Technologies for Woody Species/Horticultural/ Ornamental Species*

Conveners: Jon Mahoney, Ball Horticultural Company, and Anthony Nwangwu, Duarte Nursery

Speaker:
Chris Dardick, USDA

Improvement of ornamental and horticultural crops by traditional plant breeding techniques has several limitations mainly caused by their high degree of heterozygosity, the length of their juvenile phase, incompatibility, and adaptation to the changing climate. On the other hand, crop improvement by new breeding technologies employs precision breeding tools and techniques to overcome some of the challenges encountered by traditional breeding. It’s now possible to precisely make gene specific modifications to express or suppress desired and undesired traits in a record time. This session will explore the impact of both traditional and emerging breeding technologies on accelerating breeding of woody, horticultural and ornamental species of commercial interest. Guest speakers with years of experience in content and practice of breeding technologies will share their experiences and address any question(s) from the audience during the session. 

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

Photo Biomodulation

Conveners: Mae Ciancio, Midwestern University