Final Program

2020 Final Program

Interactive Poster Presentations are included in the program below. View posters and silent abstracts here.


Final Program and Abstracts
2020 World Congress on In Vitro Biology
Final Program Posters and Silent Abstracts
Keynote Symposium Plenary Symposia Animal Symposia
Joint Symposium Plant Symposia Animal Contributed Papers
Plant Contributed Papers Animal Posters Education Silent Abstracts
Plant Posters Index Late Submission Abstracts & Index

Sunday, June 7

20/20 on 2020 and Beyond:  Emerging In Vitro Technologies

Conveners: J. Pon Samuel, Corteva Agriscience, Mike Mann, Pairwise, Michael Dame, University of Michigan Medical School, and Durga Attili, University of Michigan Medical School

8:00 Introduction (J. P. Samuel, M. Mann, M. Dame, and D. Attili
8:05 PS-1 Author is unable to present
8:35 PS-2 Modeling Epithelial-Mesenchymal Plasticity in 3D Epithelial Organoids
Jing Yang, University of California, San Diego
9:05 PS-3 Modeling the Human Esophagus In Vitro to Understand Racial Disparities in the Tissue Response to Carcinogens
Daysha Ferrer Torres, University of Michigan Medical School
9:35 PS-4 Author is unable to present

This session captures the remarkable diversity of innovative in vitro models, recapitulating complex systems across phyla and function. We’ll learn about modeling the process of biomineralization which impacts a vast range of vital processes. Living cells biologically regulate mineral production and deposition as characterized in plant, animal and microbiota. Next, we will explore the diverse molecular landscape of human adult esophagus tissue and the corresponding in vitro derived cultures at the single-cell level. We will discuss how coupling racially diverse patient-derived tissue cultures with high-throughput screens are advancing our understanding of modeling tissue responses to carcinogens. Lastly, organoid models have demonstrated significant potential to explore a multitude of questions to which could not be addressed with previously available cell lines and animal models. 3-D organoids reproduce many of the central aspects of normal and neoplastic growth including polarized expression of differentiation and stem cell markers. These discussions will introduce some exciting new capabilities for the future of in vitro modeling.

Best Practices for Plant Tissue Culture

Conveners: Valerie Pence, Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, and Maria Jenderek, USDA-ARS

10:30 Introduction (V. Pence and  M. Jenderek)
10:35 P-3 Overview of Plant Tissue Culture Media and Practices
Gregory C. Phillips, Arkansas State University
11:05 P-1 Conservation of Magnolia Spp Using Cryobiotechnology: From Wild Collection to Ex Vitro Hardening
Raquel Folgado, The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens
11:35 P-2 Bumps, Potholes and Crashes Along the Way to Successful Micropropagation: Prevention and Intervention
Carolyn Sluis
, Tissue Grown Corporation

While there are many uses for plant tissue culture, there are some practices, principles, and challenges common throughout plant in vitro systems. This session will explore some of these including dealing with contaminants during culture initiation, the characteristics of different media and plant growth regulators, examples of application of these practices to specific plant taxa, as well as some of the major hazards to in vitro work in industry and the strategies for avoiding, minimizing, and overcoming them.

Genetic Transformation and Accelerated Breeding in Woody Plant Species

Convener: Sadanand Dhekney, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

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10:30 Introduction (S. Dhekney)
10:35 P-4 Flowering Mechanism in Woody Plants: Manipulation of Blueberry Flowering Pathway Genes for Accelerated Breeding and Yield Increase
Guoqing Song, Michigan State University
11:05 P-5 Rapid Cycle Breeding of Tree Species
Ann Callahan, USDA-ARS

Perennial woody tree species are considered to be recalcitrant to plant regeneration and genetic transformation. The complex genetic background of cultivars makes the transformation very genotype-dependent. Additionally, a long juvenile period for woody plant species makes the breeding of fruit and forest trees more time-consuming compared to the time required for breeding annual crops. It can take more than 15 to 20 years to breed new fruit tree cultivars. Based on modern technologies, flowering mechanism and key genes to shorten tree juvenility have been discovered and utilized in woody plant breeding. Our invited speakers will share their perspective, experience and knowledge in woody plant genetic transformation and accelerated breeding techniques for the development of improved cultivars.

Organoid Models: Windows into Human Disorders

Conveners: Durga Attili, University of Michigan Medical School, and Michael Dame, University of Michigan Medical School

10:30 Introduction (D. Attili and M. Dame)
10:35 A-1 “Gut-in-a-Dish” Model for Developing Personalized Therapies for Chronic Diseases
Soumita Das, University of California, San Diego
11:05 A-2 From Brain Organoids to Animal Chimera: Novel Platforms for Studying Human Brain Development and Disease
Abed Alfattah Mansour, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies
11:35 A-3 Integrative Modeling of Human Brain Development and Neurodevelopment Disorders
Bennett Novitch, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

Recent improvements in stem cell technology allow differentiation of pluripotent stem cells derived from patient skin cells to form 3D multicellular organoids to study human development and disease. These techniques advanced the ability to grow stem cell derived brain organoids, “mini brains in a dish”, and offered unparalleled opportunity to study human brain development and mechanisms of disease that previously lacked reliable model systems. In this session, speakers will present data from recently pioneered human brain organoid systems to understand the basis of neurodevelopmental disorders, molecular mechanisms controlling developmental processes, stem/progenitor cell regulation, cell fate decision-making, repair and neuropsychiatric disorders. Finally, work with human gastrointestinal organoids will be presented to demonstrate the novel use of organoid models to develop diagnoses and therapies for a spectrum of chronic gastrointestinal diseases including infectious disease and cancer.

Leadership and Best Practices in Commercial Laboratories -21st Century and Beyond

Conveners: Anthony Nwangwu, Duarte Nursery, and Benjamin Hughes

In Vitro Technologies for Clean Plant Production in Cannabis

Conveners: Max Jones, University of Guelph, and Hemant Lata, University of Mississippi

1:30 Introduction (M. Jones and H. Lata)
1:35 P-9 Ignorance is Bliss? An Overview of Diseases Affecting Cannabis
David Joly, Université de Moncton
2:05 P-10 Advances in Micropropagation of Cannabis
Max Jones, University of Guelph
2:35 P-11 In Vitro Technologies for Clean Plant Production in Cannabis
Jeremy Warren, Dark Heart Nursery

Throughout the history, medicinal plants have been used as a traditional medicine for the prevention and treatment of variety of illnesses. However, developing a natural product as a modern, single molecule drug faces a lot of challenges from farm to pharmaceuticals. It needs batch to batch consistency in its biomass product and in secondary metabolites. Cannabis, being a dioceous and highly heterozygous plant, in terms of its botany and chemistry, faces some unusual extra challenges. To maintain the consistency in cannabis biomass product, male plants are removed from the growing area and only high yielding female plants are maintained for the future propagation. In this process, micropropagation can play an important role in mass-propagation of cannabis while maintaining the consistency in secondary metabolites. In this session, cannabis botany, its propagation using conventional and advance biotechnological techniques and the challenges in cultivation of a medical grade cannabis will be discussed.

Plan(t)s for the Future Planet

Conveners: Pierluigi Barone, Corteva Agriscience, and Todd J. Jones, Corteva Agriscience

1:30 Introduction (P. Barone and T. J. Jones)
1:35 P-6 Deciphering the Molecular and Cellular Development of a C4 Photosynthetic Leaf
Tammy Sage, University of Toronto
2:05 P-7 Harnessing Plant Biology to Address Climate Change
Wolfgang Busch, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies
2:35 P-8 Engineering the Nitrogen-fixing Nodulation Trait Using Legumes and the Tropical Parasponia Tree (Cannabaceae) as Templates
Rene Geurts, Wageningen University & Research

In the coming decades agricultural production faces tremendous challenges in terms of productivity growth and natural resource use efficiency and environmental stewardship. The increased demand for food and feed associated with climatic changes will require the development of plants able to use fertilizers more efficiently, remove more carbon from the environment, and maintain soil and water quality. In this symposium our speakers will share some of the most recent efforts to translate advances in applied plant biology and biotechnology to accelerate crop improvement and sustainability.

New Approach Methods for Drug Discovery in Japan
SPONSORED BY THE JAPANESE SOCIETY OF ALTERNATIVES TO ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS (JSAAAE) AND THE JAPANESE TISSUE CULTURE ASSOCIATION (JTCA)

Conveners: Hajime Kojima, National Institute of Health Sciences, and Yohei Hayashi, RIKEN Bioresource Research Center

1:30 Introduction (H. Kojima and Y. Hayashi)
1:35 A-4 Collagen Vitrigel Membrane Useful for Fabricating Three-dimensional Culture Models and Their Application to the Development of Test Methods for Predicting ADME/Tox of Chemicals
Toshiaki Takezawa, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
2:05 A-5 Drug Discovery Using Disease-specific iPS Cell Collection in RIKEN Cell Bank
Yohei Hayashi, RIKEN Bioresource Research Center
2:35 A-6 Development of Novel Drug Safety Assessments Using Human iPS Cell Technology
Yasunari Kanda, National Institute of Health Sciences
3:05 A-7 Consideration Points for the Development of Microphysiological System
Seiichi Ishida, National Institute of Health Sciences

Seeking to become a global leader in the field of stem cell technology since Dr. S. Yamanaka’s Novel prize on the development of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) in 2012, the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED) has provided support for the research and development into clinical application of regenerative medicine and a useful tool for conducting risk assessments of drug candidates with stem cell technology. In this symposium, we focus the projects on drug discovery with hiPSC under the Japanese funding agency and introduce the current researches of new safety pharmacology test, new scaffolds for the cells, patient-derived iPSC bank and the Microphysiological Systems (MPS).

2020 World Congress on In Vitro Biology Opening Ceremony
Program Chair: Michael K. Dame, University of Michigan Medical School and Allan R.  Wenck. BASF

3:15 Welcome and Opening  Remarks
Allan R. Wenck, President, Society for In Vitro Biology
3:25 Robert H. Lawrence, Jr. Keynote Symposium
Introduction
Michael K. Dame, University of Michigan Medical School
3:30 KS-1 Emergence of Spontaneous Oscillatory Networks from Human Brain Organoids
Alysson R. Muotri, Professor, Sanford Consortium, University of California, San Diego

The complexity of the human brain, with thousands of neuronal types, permits the development of sophisticated behavioral repertoires, such as language, tool use, self-awareness, symbolic thought, cultural learning and consciousness. Understanding what produces neuronal diversification during brain development has been a longstanding challenge for neuroscientists and may bring insights into the evolution of human cognition. Human pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types, such as neurons and glia. Moreover, induced pluripotent stem cells can be achieved from living individuals by reprogramming somatic cells that would capture their entire genome in a pluripotent state. From these pluripotent state, it is possible to generate models of the human brain, such as brain organoids. We have been using brain-model technology (BMT) to gain insights on several biological processes, such as human neurodevelopment and evolution. We also applied BMT to measure the impact of genetic variants in autism spectrum disorders and for evolutionary studies. The reconstruction of human synchronized network activity in a dish can help to understand how neural network oscillations might contribute to the social brain. Our findings suggest a potential bridge to the gap between the microscale in vitro neural networks electrophysiology and non-invasive electroencephalogram.
4:15 2020 Society for In Vitro Biology Awards Ceremony
2020 Distinguished, Fellow and Young Scientist Award Recipients
Allan R. Wenck, President, Society for In Vitro Biology
(All recipients will be acknowledged on the website for the 2020 World Congress on In Vitro Biology Meeting and in person at the 2021 In Vitro Biology Meeting next year in Norfolk, VA)
4:20 Distinguished Scientist Award Acceptances:
Fredy Altpeter, University of Florida
4:25 Michael J. Fay, Midwestern University
4:30 Fellow Award Acceptances:
Michael K. Dame,
University of Michigan Medical School
4:35 William Gordon-Kamm, Corteva Agriscience
4:40 Lucila E. J. Lee, University of the Fraser Valley
4:45 Young Scientist Award Acceptance:
Yiping Qi, University of Maryland
4:50 2020 Distinguished Service Award Acknowledgements
John W. Harbell,
JHarbell Consulting
(All recipients will be acknowledged on the website for the 2020 World Congress on In Vitro Biology Meeting and in person at the 2021 In Vitro Biology Meeting next year in Norfolk, VA)

Barbara B. Doonan, New York Medical College
John J. Finer
, The Ohio State University
Sukhpreet Sandhu
Dwight T. Tomes
Brad L. Upham
, Michigan State University
Harold N. Trick
, Kansas State University
Kan Wang
, Iowa State University
Allan R. Wenck
, BASF

5:00 2020 Lifetime Achievement Award Presentation:
Introduction
Todd J. Jones, Corteva Agriscience
5:05 2020 Lifetime Achievement Award Acceptance
Dwight T. Tomes
5:15 Adjourn

KS-1
Emergence of Spontaneous Oscillatory Networks from Human Brain Organoids
Keynote Speaker: Alysson R. Muotri, Professor, Sanford Consortium, University of California, San Diego

The complexity of the human brain, with thousands of neuronal types, permits the development of sophisticated behavioral repertoires, such as language, tool use, self-awareness, symbolic thought, cultural learning and consciousness. Understanding what produces neuronal diversification during brain development has been a longstanding challenge for neuroscientists and may bring insights into the evolution of human cognition. Human pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types, such as neurons and glia. Moreover, induced pluripotent stem cells can be achieved from living individuals by reprogramming somatic cells that would capture their entire genome in a pluripotent state. From these pluripotent state, it is possible to generate models of the human brain, such as brain organoids. We have been using brain-model technology (BMT) to gain insights on several biological processes, such as human neurodevelopment and evolution. We also applied BMT to measure the impact of genetic variants in autism spectrum disorders and for evolutionary studies. The reconstruction of human synchronized network activity in a dish can help to understand how neural network oscillations might contribute to the social brain. Our findings suggest a potential bridge to the gap between the microscale in vitro neural networks electrophysiology and non-invasive electroencephalogram.

Student Workshop: Biology at True Resolution

Conveners: Brad L. Upham, Michigan State University, Cristofer Calvo, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and Bretton Hale, Arkansas State University

7:30 Introduction (B. L. Upham, C. Calvo and B. Hale)
7:35 E-1 Biology at True Resolution
Nicole Abreu, 10X Genomics

The Next GEM technology is built on a new chip architecture that integrates seamlessly into existing solutions. This technology will enable future solutions and product improvements. The Next GEM technology combines new chips and reagents, and is currently offered for the following solutions:

– Chromium Single Cell Gene Expression Solution
– Chromium Single Cell Immune Profiling Solution
– Chromium Single Cell ATAC Solution

Additionally, the relationship between cells and their relative locations within a tissue sample can be critical to understanding disease pathology. Spatial transcriptomics is a groundbreaking technology that allows scientists to measure all the gene activity in a tissue sample and map where the activity is occurring. Already this technology is leading to new discoveries that will prove instrumental in helping scientists gain a better understanding of biological processes and disease.

Monday, June 8

Frontiers in Single Cell Technologies

Conveners: Yun Yue, Corteva Agriscience, Brad Upham, Michigan State University, Pon Samuel, Corteva Agriscience, Bretton Hale, Arkansas State University, Joshua Z. Gasiorowski, Midwestern University, Kolla Kristjansdottir, Midwestern University, and Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University

8:00 Introduction (Y. Yue, B. Upham, P. Samuel, B. Hale, J. Z. Gasirowski, K. Kristjansdottir, and A. Alt-Holland)
8:05 PS-5 10X Genomics Tools for Studying Biology at True Resolution
Nicole Abreu, 10X Genomics
8:35 PS-6 Application of Single Nuclei Transcriptomics to Assess the Hepatic Effects of Dioxin
Rance Nault, Michigan State University
9:05 PS-7 Microproteomic Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Cell Protrusions
Karine Gousset, California State University Fresno

Multicellular organisms, including plants and animals, are integrated into a cellular hierarchy, which is comprised of cell syncitia that are further organized into tissues forming unique organs with specialized functions allowing the existence of an organism. The regulation of gene expression ultimately determines the type and function of cells and tissues. Due to a lack of technologies, past research often had to rely on measurements in bulk populations of cells within tissues to study gene expression, cell function, and tissue physiology. However, recent advances in single-cell technologies are becoming essential tools to unmask the heterogeneity of cell functions within a tissue. As noted, most of our scientific knowledge generally stemmed from population data where we consider cells belonging to the same subtype as a single unit, in which all the members that compose the class are, by definition, homogeneous and identical. This concept represents an extreme simplification of reality, which can be attributed both to the necessary simplification required to understand the global picture and also to the lack of past technologies and data analysis techniques that allow more fine‐grained investigations. The absence of technologies for studying single cells has had the most significant impact on the analysis of cells that occur as a minimal fraction of the initial population: such as stem cells. Recent advances in single-cell technologies are now allowing the study of single cells or cell types for different phenotypic markers simultaneously. In plants, individual gametophytic cells are reprogramed to produce haploid embryoids that can be doubled to generate di-haploids. This technology has helped plant breeders accelerate improving many of the food crops. In mammalian systems, these new single-cell technologies are transforming our fundamental understanding of how individual cells play unique roles within the tissue and will lead to many breakthroughs in understanding the many pathologies affecting human health. In this session, we will showcase a few examples of single-cell technologies powering fundamental research on the cell heterogeneity of tissues.

Applications of Omic’s Technologies

Conveners: Kolla Kristjansdottir, Midwestern University, and Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University

Speaker:
TBD
Kelly A. Frazer, University of California, San Diego
Microproteomic Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Cell Protrusions
Karine Gousset
, California State University, Fresno

In the last decade, innovations in state-of-the-art equipment, research methodologies and data analyses have revolutionized the omics fields. At the DNA and RNA levels, transcriptomics, genome wide associations, and most recently next-generation sequencing, have made genomic studies common even in small academic and agricultural labs. At the protein level, proteomics can be used to discover the identity of thousands of proteins and post-translational modifications in complex samples or to provide highly sensitive targeted quantification. At the cellular and systemic metabolism levels, metabolomics, is understudied partly because the metabolome cannot be determined from the genetic sequence of an organism. Comprehensive databases from experimental and clinical data are being compiled for use in toxicology, disease research, environmental analysis and agriculture. Collectively, the omics fields generate staggering amounts of data. The current challenge is to integrate this data with traditional cell and biochemical studies in order to provide a more complete and accurate picture of working biological systems. This session will discuss key applications, techniques and recent advances in genomics, proteomics and metabolomics.

Plant Biotechnology Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition

Moderator: Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, CTC Genomics​

Panel of Judges reviewing the presentations: Alexandre Da Silva Conceicao, Calyxt, Massimo Bosacchi, KWS, Fei Zhang, Yale University, and Feng Zhang, University of Minnesota

10:30 Introduction (C. Hernandez-Garcia)
10:35 P-1001 Localized Regulation of Hybrid SN19 and GUS Genes Expression Driven by Pathogen Related Promoters in Potato
Hussein Abdullah Ahmed Ahmed, Ankara University, Serkan Uranbey, Guray Akdogan, Sancar Fatih Ozcan, Cengiz Sancak, and Sebahattin Ozcan
10:50 P-1002 Accelerating Optimization of Genome Editing in Sugarcane
Ayman Eid, DOE Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation and University of Florida, Chakravarthi Mohan, Sara Sanchez, Duoduo Wang, and Fredy Altpeter
11:05 P-1003 Towards Effective Biolistics-mediated Transformation in Hornwort (Anthoceros agrestis) to Unlock Genes Involved in Plant-cyanobacteria Symbiosis
A. Gunadi, Boyce Thompson Institute, X. Xu, F. W. Li, and J. Van Eck
11:20 P-1004 Cytokinins Improve Shoot Regeneration Efficiency in Two Indian Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. Narashima and G. arboreum cv. AKA-7) Cultivars
Sameena E. Tanwir, University of Florida, Mohd. Akmal Neera B. Sarin, and Jawaid A. Khan

To support the Society’s vision to encourage education and scientific informational exchange and recognize outstanding post docs, the Plant Biotechnology Section is pleased to announce the 2020 Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition. Competition finalists were selected based on the quality of the abstracts. A panel of judges will evaluate the presentations at the meeting. Criteria for the evaluation include experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, appearance and ability of the post-doctoral candidate to present it. Winners will be presented with a certificate and a cash award at the meeting.

Plant Biotechnology Contributed Papers

Moderator: Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, CTC Genomics

11:35 Introduction (C. Hernandez-Garcia)
11:40 P-1005 Reprogramming of Stem Cell Activity to Convert Thorns into Branches in Citrus
Fei Zhang, Yale University, Pascale Rossignol, Tengbo Huang, Yewei Wang, Alan May, Christopher L. Dupont, Vladimir Orbović, and Vivian Irish
11:55 P-1006 A Comparative Analysis on the Crop Performance in Cannabis sativa Between Tissue Cultured Propagules Versus Propagules from Tissue Cultured Stock
Norman Senn, CRTFD Plant Science, LLC, Savanah St. Clair, Angelo Alvarez, and Maryam Saraylou

To support the Society’s vision to encourage education and scientific informational exchange and recognize outstanding post docs, the Plant Biotechnology Section is pleased to announce the 2020 Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition. Competition finalists were selected based on the quality of the abstracts. A panel of judges will evaluate the presentations at the meeting. Criteria for the evaluation include experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, appearance and ability of the post-doctoral candidate to present it. Winners will be presented with a certificate and a cash award at the meeting.

Plant Biotechnology Student Oral Presentation Competition

Moderator: Veena Veena, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Panel of Plant Biotechnology Experts Evaluating the Contestants: Sivamani Elumalai, Syngenta Crop Protection, LLC, Jeffrey M. Staub, Plastomics, Inc., and Kan Wang, Iowa State University

10:30 Introduction (V. Veena)
10:35 P-1007 Flower Power: A Rapid In Vitro Regeneration Protocol from In Vitro Cannabis sativa Inflorescences
Adrian S. Monthony, University of Guelph, and A. Maxwell P. Jones
10:50 P-1008 Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Class II Glutaredoxin Mutants Generated Via CRISPR/Cas9 System Are Susceptible to Multiple Abiotic Stresses
T. Kakeshpour, Kansas State University, T. Tamang, Q. Wu, J. Park, and S. Park
11:05 P-1009 Evaluation of miRNA Mediated Networking and Feedback Against Drought, Heat and Combined Stress Tolerance in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)
Arslan Asim, Niğde Ömer Halisdemir University, Ufuk Demirel, Allah Bakhsh, and Zahide Neslihan Ozturk Gökçe
11:20 P-1010 High Yields Secretion of Human Erythropoietin from Tobacco Cell for Ex Vivo Production of Red Blood Cells
Uddhab Karki, Arkansas State University, and Jianfeng Xu
11:35 P-1011 In Vitro Plant Metabolism of Plant Protection Products
Leonie Hillebrands, Bayer AG Division CropScience, Marc Lamshoeft, Andreas Lagojda, Andreas Stork, and Oliver Kayser
11:50 P-1012 RNA-Seq Analysis of Fruit Retention-Regulated Gene Expression and Its Variation by Hexanal in ‘Honeycrisp’ (Malus domestica Borkh.)
Karthika Sriskantharajah, University of Guelph, Erika DeBrouwer, Alan Sullivan, Gopinadhan Paliyath, and Jayasankar Subramanian

To support the Society’s vision to encourage education and scientific informational exchange and recognize outstanding students, the Plant Biotechnology Section is pleased to announce the “Plant Biotechnology Student Oral Presentation Competition” at the 2020 World. A panel of judges will evaluate the presentations at the meeting. Criteria for the evaluation include experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, appearance and ability of the student candidate to present it. Winners will be presented with a certificate and a cash award at the meeting.

Student Networking Luncheon

Conveners: Cristofer Calvo, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and Bretton Hale, Arkansas State University

In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition

Moderators: Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University and Kolla Kristjansdottir, Midwestern University

Panel of In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences experts evaluating the contestants: Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University, Kolla Kristjansdottir, Midwestern University, John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting, LLC, Barbara Doonan, New York Medical College, Michael J. Fay, Midwestern University, Brad L. Upham, Michigan State University, Mae Ciancio, Midwestern University, Debora Esposito, North Carolina State University, and Kristina Martinez-Guryn, Midwestern University

1:30 Introduction (A. Alt-Holland and K. Kristjansdottir)
1:35 A-1000 Decellularized Plant Biomaterials Are Adaptable 3D Scaffolds to Study Cellular Growth, Invasion, and Ex Vivo Tissue Regeneration
Connor P. Dyer, Midwestern University, Connor J. Niemiec, Alexander W. Matyga, and Joshua Z. Gasiorowski
1:50 A-1001 Sulforaphane Inhibits Colon Adenoma Organoid Formation and Induces Differentiation in a Dose-dependent Manner
Evan M. Hill, University of Michigan School of Public Health, J. Burnett, A. Tapaswi, M. K. Dame, J. R. Spence, M. S. Bohm, C. L. McCarthy, K. Karpoff, D. Sun, G. Chen, and J. A. Colacino
2:05 A-1002 Prenylated Stilbenoids as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Triple Negative Breast Cancer
Sepideh Mohammadhosseinpour, Arkansas State University, Linh-Chi Ho, Cecily Long, and Fabricio Medina-Bolivar

The In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences Section (IVACS) of the Society for In Vitro Biology is pleased to announce the 2020 Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition during the World Congress on In Vitro Biology. This competition encourages the exchange of scientific information between the presenters, attendees and judges, and provides an invaluable opportunity for students and post-docs to enhance their presentation delivery and public speaking skills. The top three finalists were selected for the competition based on the quality of their abstracts, as well as the merit of their research and scientific findings. During the Oral Presentation Competition session, a panel of expert judges will grade the presentations. Evaluation criteria will include: experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, professionalism and ability of the finalist to explain the research and answer questions, and importantly, adherence to the allocated time for the presentation. The Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition session serves to recognize and reward the research and achievements of outstanding students and talented post-docs. Therefore, the three finalists will be presented with a certificate and a cash award during the World Congress.

Genetic Engineering

Moderator: QingChun, Pairwise

Introduction (Q. Shi)
P-2012 NsD3, a Defensin from Nigella sativa, Confers High Resistance of Several Commercial Potato Varieties to Fungi and Bacteria
Denis Beliaev, K. A.Timiryazev’s Institute of Plant Physiology, Eugene A. Rogozhin, Alexei A. Meleshin, Dmitriy V. Tereshonok, Marina K. Derevyagina, Natalya O. Yuorieva, Ilina I. Tashlieva, Fevzi S. Djalilov, and Elena V. Voronkova
P-2014 Development of Indirect Shoot Organogenesis and Agrobacterium-mediated Transformation for Antirrhinum majus
Zhaoyuan Lian, University of Florida, Sandra Wilson, Jianjun Chen, Heqiang Huo, and Chi D. Nguyen
P-2016 Isolation and Functional Characterization of Novel Citrus and Plum Fruit Promoters
J. G. Thomson, USDA-ARS, K. Dasgupta, and R. Thilmony
P-2017 Can a Single Metabolic Gene Modulate a Rhizosphere Microbiome Through Exudation of Plant?
Ekaterina N. Baranova, All-Russia Research Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology, Alexander A. Gulevich, and Galina N. Raldugina

Plant Tissue Culture

Moderator: Micah Stevens, Sierra Gold Nursery

Introduction (M. Stevens)
P-2000 Silicon Supplementation and Staphylococcus scuiri SAT-17 Inoculation Improved the Morphogenesis and Physio-biochemical Patterns in In Vitro Grown Sugarcane
Muhammad Sohail Akram, Government College University, Raheel Parvez Abbasi, Naeem Iqbal, and Muhammad Azeem
P-2001 Direct Adventitious Shoot Bud Induction Integrated with Direct Somatic Embryogenesis: A New Method for Date Palm Micropropagation
C. Sudhersan, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, S. Jibi, L. Al-Sabah, and S. Al-Melhem
P-2002 Abstract has been withdrawn
P-2003 In Vitro Culture of Thymus capitatus L.: Development of New Shoots and Callus
Dorsaf Kriaa, University of Sassari, and Grazia Maria Scarpa
P-2005 A Newly Designed Chamber for the Acclimatization of Coconut Plantlets Coming from In Vitro
Zhihua Mu, The University of Queensland, Xuhong Guo, Julianne Biddle, Mike Foale, and Zhiying Li, and Steve Adkins

Building Partnerships and Resources to Address Transformation Bottlenecks

Conveners: Mary Ann Saltarikos, Bayer U.S. – Crop Science, and Joyce Van Eck, Boyce Thompson Institute

Speakers:
Building Partnerships and Approaches for Overcoming Bottlenecks that Prevent Efficient Genetic Engineering and Gene Editing
Mary Ann Saltarikos, Bayer U.S. – Crop Science
Challenges that Hinder Progress of Genetic Engineering and Gene Editing
Joyce Van Eck, Boyce Thompson Institute

Panelists:
Raj Deepika Chauhan, Pairwise
William Gordon-Kamm, Corteva Agriscience
Javier Narvaez
, Cibus US LLC
Mary Ann Saltarikos, Bayer U.S. – Crop Science
Nigel Taylor, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
Joyce Van Eck, Boyce Thompson Institute
Kan Wang, Iowa State University

Bottlenecks that thwart achieving efficient genetic engineering and gene editing approaches in plants can come at various stages including plant regeneration, transformation, and recovery of quality (low copy number, desirable phenotype) modified lines.  With the advent of gene editing technologies, tailor-made genetic modifications to help advance crop improvement can be realized and has resulted in a demand more than ever before for reliable, robust genetic engineering pipelines.  Efforts to develop these pipelines are underway by researchers in both the public and private sectors; however, progress is often slowed due to several factors such as access to germplasm, limited funding, and lack of resources that include infrastructure and experienced personnel.  The purpose of this session is to explore possibilities for building connections within and between public and private research organizations.  Through two presentations that will present overviews of the issues, a panel discussion, and audience participation we intend to establish a foundation that will help us move forward by identifying where the greatest needs are and how we can collaborate as a community to address them.

Digital Agriculture – Sensors, Machine Learning and Image Analysis

Conveners: Randall P. Niedz, USDA, and Kan Wang, Iowa State University

3:30 Introduction (R. P. Niedz and K. Wang)
3:35 P-12 Maximizing the Value of Your Imaging Data with High-content Image Analysis and Deep Learning
Beth Cimini, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
4:05 P-14 Precision Agriculture Sensors
Liang Dong, Iowa State University
4:35 P-13 In Vitro Data Collection Using Image Analysis and Machine Learning
Randall Niedz, U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, USDA

A large number of devices/sensors exist that provide a quantitative and objective representation of the plant, in planta and ex planta, and its environment. Many of these devices elucidate properties, often in real-time, either not visible to the human eye or otherwise impossible or difficult to quantify without these devices. These devices typically generate large amounts of data, and software is required to collect, organize, and analyze these large data sets. The combination of these devices and software is redefining what is meant by “field observable” properties. The results include precision agriculture where all aspects of crop production are controlled more accurately, and agricultural research where these measures provide a new level of detail that is furthering our understanding of the genetic x environment interactions and the complexity that characterizes biological systems. The technological goal is the precise monitoring, quantification, and control of all aspects of plant growth and development. The session will discuss sensor technology, including microsensors for real-time individual plant phenotyping, the principles and advances in image analysis and machine learning, and the collection and use of data obtained by machine learning image analysis in classical and DOE plant tissue culture experiments.

MicroRNA and Cellular Dysfunction

Conveners:  Jeff Kwak, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Michael Fay, Midwestern University

3:30 Introduction (J. Kwak and M. Fay)
3:35 A-8 MiR-145 Mediates Cell Morphology-regulated Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation to Smooth Muscle Cells
Yi-Ting Yeh, University of California San Diego
4:05 A-9 Local and Systemic Effects of Cancer-secreted Extracellular miRNA
Shizhen (Emily) Wang, University of California, San Diego
4:35 A-10 Role of MicroRNAs in Hematopoietic Development and Cancer
Dinesh Rao, UCLA Health
MicroRNAs in Hematopoeitic Development and Cancer
Dinesh Rao, UCLA Health

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20-25 nt) non-coding RNAs that block gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. It is estimated that the expression of over 50% of mammalian protein coding genes are regulated by miRNAs, and a single miRNA may regulate expression of hundreds of mRNAs. Since the discovery of miRNAs, there has been great interest in determining the roles of miRNAs in regard to cellular function and dysfunction. This symposium will focus on the roles of non-coding RNAs with an emphasis on cancer and differentiation.

Non-competitive Student Oral Presentations

Moderators: Cristofer Calvo, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and Bretton Hale, Arkansas State University

Gene Editing

Moderator: Ming Cheng, Pairwise

5:00 Introduction (M. Cheng)
5:05 P-1017 Improvement of Protoplast Proliferation for Efficient Genotype-independent Gene Editing
R. Welsch, Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, S. Pandey, A. Moradi, J. Dawson, R. Uhl, and K. Palme
5:20 P-1018 CRISPR-Cas12b Genome Engineering Systems in Plants
Yiping Qi, University of Maryland, Meiling Ming, Qiurong Ren, Changtian Pan, Yao He, Yingxiao Zhang, Shishi Liu, Zhaohui Zhong, Jiaheng Wang, Aimee A. Malzahn, Jun Wu, Xuelian Zheng, and Yong Zhang
5:35 P-1020 Improvement of Gene Delivery and Mutation Frequencies in the CRISPR-Cas9 Wheat Genomics System
Myeong-Je Cho, University of California, Berkeley, Jaclyn Tanaka, Snigdha Poddar, Bastian Minkenberg, and Brian Staskawicz

MIcropropagation

Moderator: Nagesh Sardesai, Corteva Agriscience

5:00 Introduction (N. Sardesai)
5:05 P-1013 Marker Assisted Selection of Elite Genotypes in Some Medicinal Plants, Their Micropropagation, Isolation and In Vitro Elicitation of Anticancerous Compounds
Veena Agrawal, University of Delhi
5:20 P-1014 Effect of BAP and TDZ on Direct Shoot Organogenesis in Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.)
Eveline Yee Yan Kong, The University of Queensland, Julianne Biddle, Sisunandar Sudarma, Bart Panis, and Steve W. Adkins
5:35 P-1015 Temperature Effects on Recovery and Growth of Shoot Tips of Quercus virginiana After Liquid Nitrogen Exposure
V. C. Pence, Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden

IVACS Contributed Paper Session

Moderator: James Varani, University of Michigan Medical School

5:00 Introduction (J. Varani)
5:05 A-1003 Stem Cell-derived Neuronal Models Provide Unique Insights into Viral Pathogenesis of the Human Brain and Can Identify Novel Biomarkers for Next-Generation Viral Diagnostics
Nathan Godde, CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory Ryan Farr, Vinod Sundaramoorthy, Diane Green, Paul Monaghan, Johanna Dups, Rachael Chatterton, Bronwyn Clayton, Reuben Klein, Sean Todd, Cameron Stewart, Chris Rootes, John Bingham, Carmel O’Brien, and Megan Dearnley
5:20 A-1004 Development of a Sponge Cell Line: A Retrospective
Shirley A. Pomponi, Florida Atlantic University – Harbor Branch Oceaonographic Institute, and Rene H. Wijffels
5:35 A-1005 The Cutaneous Microenvironment Is Important for the Transition of Melanoma from Non-Aggressive, In Situ Growth to Invasive, Metastatic Disease
Lindsay Dezi, Midwestern University, Gustavo Untiveros, and Luigi Strizzi

Transformation of Maize and Other Cereals Using Morphogenic Genes: An Update and Practical Tips

Conveners: Bill Gordon-Kamm, Corteva Agriscience, Kan Wang, Iowa State University, and Ajith Anand, Corteva Agriscience

Panelists:
Bill Gordon-Kamm, Corteva Agriscience
Kan Wang, Iowa State University
Ajith Anand, Corteva Agriscience

Plant morphogenic genes can be used to improve genetic transformation of recalcitrant maize inbred genotypes as well as other cereal crops.  In this workshop, we intend to share our protocol details and tips for maize inbred transformation.  We will show video to demonstrate the step-by-step protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated immature embryo transformation.  This procedure has been successfully reproduced by researchers with minimum maize transformation training.  Following the video (with discussion), a presentation on maize leaf transformation will also be used to contrast differences between the two protocols.  Finally, we’d like to hear from researchers who have attempted using the morphogenic genes, emphasizing both what worked well and where there were problems, providing an opportunity to discuss trouble-shooting the process.

Tuesday, June 9

Bioethics and Public Policy for Benefits and Concerns in Plants and Animals

Conveners:  Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University, and Kenneth Kandaras, International Foundation for Ethical Research

8:00 Introduction (A. Alt-Holland and K. Kandaras)
8:05 PS-9 Bioethics and Public Policy for Benefits and Concerns in Plants and Animals
David Resnik, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Bioethics began as a multi-disciplinary field of study that has significantly developed since the 1970s. It is an integrated field in which moral and ethical discussions and views of new developments in the life sciences arena – including technology, biotechnology, medicine, biology, and environmental sciences – are combined with social sciences, including philosophy, theology, law, and public policies. On one hand, the Bioethics field examines the ways in which new medicines, biomedical procedures and interventions, as well as genetic modifications of plants and animals, can benefit millions of peoples, the humankind and the environment, as a whole. On the other hand, Bioethics carefully examines and deliberates ethical questions about the potential risks and harms that these innovations and groundbreaking advancements, as well as their inadvertent and inappropriate use, may cause. Additionally, Bioethics provides an important platform for bringing to light different perspectives of public awareness and general understanding of the topics in debate, as well as the viewpoints of various individuals and populations that could be directly affected by the resulted public policies. With the rapid advances in agricultural and biomedical technologies, ethical and moral questions involving the implementation of these advances become more complex. Some of the well-known topics that spurred extensive news media of public and ethical concerns, and meaningful public debates relate to industrial, agriculture and farm practice, animal welfare and rights in food production and biomedical research, and commercial cultivation of genetically modified crops. This Plenary session will highlight some of the bioethical perspectives of benefits and concerns in plants and animals, and their contributions to the generation of public policies

Emulating Human Liver in Preclinical Research and Regenerative Medicine

Conveners: Seyoum Ayehunie, MatTek Corporation, and John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting

10:30 Introduction (S. Ayehunie and J. W. Harbell)
10:35 A-11 Mechanistic Insight and Prediction of Drug-induced Organ Injury for Humans
Alison EM Vickers, Human Translational Models, LLC
11:05 A-12 An In Vitro Model of Human Fatty Liver Disease
Aras Mattis, University of California, San Francisco

A chronic problem in pharmaceutical development has been the frequency that candidate compounds fail in clinical trials due to unexpected hepatic toxicity. In these cases, the preclinical testing in animal models had failed to identify a selective human toxicity. In addition, there is a growing need to model human liver damage such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (fatty liver disease) which is now driving a majority of liver transplantation cases. In vitro liver tissue models are gaining importance for safety and efficacy prediction of pharmacological research and disease modeling. Obtaining primary liver cells on a continuous basis is difficult at best. To overcome these limitations, emerging technologies provide alternative liver cell source including inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for in vitro predictive models for liver physiology and functionality. Such models would allow for the study of hepatotoxicity, xenobiotic metabolism and selective organ degeneration. The challenge has been compounded by the limited availability of donor organs, multiple cells types to address within the liver and the rapid reduction in xenobiotic metabolic competence (p450 activity) with time in traditional culture. To address these challenges, 3D culture systems have been developed to allow maintenance of normal cell shape and interaction. In some cases, multiple cell types can be incorporated. These and other features of the models allow the maintenance of some degree of p450 activity. This symposium will feature three approaches to address the promise and challenges in the development of physiologically functional 3D liver cell cultures. These presentations will include liver slide culture from mature liver, bioprinting of 3D structures from component cell types and development of iPSC-derived hepatocytes for research and regenerative medicine.

Plant Genome Engineering – From Lab to Consumers

Conveners:  Jyoti Rout, Intrexon Corporation, and Harold Trick, Kansas State University

Speakers:
New Innovations for Accelerating the Green Revolution
Sekhar Boddupalli, GreenVenus
Synthetic Apomixis for Hybrid Crop Propagation
Imtiyaz Khanday, University of California, Davis
Consumers Attitudes Towards Gene Editing
Brandon R. McFadden, University of Delaware

To date, advances in agricultural biotechnology via Ag biotechnology / genetic engineering (GE) predominantly have focused on improving Agronomic traits. Most successes with developing products targeting consumers using GE platform have been limited to few examples viz high Oleic acid soy, non-browning apples and potatoes and omega-3 enriched soy. Although, consumer awareness of GE platform seems to have increased over the last decade, however, the acceptance of food derived using GE platform has been painfully slow. Today we are surrounded by consumers living in an era where introduction of “fast products” and “constant disruptions” of the marketplace with new products are a new norm. In these changing times, what is crucial for Ag biotech industry is to reinvent itself for delivering products faster – based on innovation, speed to market with agility / rapid scale-up provisions and addressing consumer sentiments at a continuous pace. Product development via gene editing offers advantages for speed breeding by bypassing conventional long process of bringing products to the marketplace. This session will cover new tools relating to speed to market and consumer acceptance related issues.

Plant Memory: The Importance of Assessing Culture Carry Over Effects During Micropropagation Protocol Development

Conveners: Michael E. Kane, University of Florida, and Ben Hughes, AG3, Inc

10:30 Introduction (B. Hughes)
10:35 P-15 An Overview of Epigenesis in In Vitro Cultured Plants
Clelia De-la-Peña, Unidad de Biotecnología
11:05 P-16 Plant Growth Regulator Carry-Over Effects on the Micropropagation Process
Michael Kane, University of Florida
11:35 P-17 Overcoming Obstacles Associated with Woody Plant Micropropagation
Reid Robinson and Micah Stevens, Sierra Gold Nursery

Reliable commercially-viable micropropagation protocols must be designed for consistent and efficient upscaled production of genetically stable and vigorous young plants. In previous SIVB symposia, important emphasis has been placed on improving culture media using Design of Experiment (DOE) procedures. Success in developing sustainable micropropagation protocols also requires an understanding of factors influencing plant responses in vitro including initiation, shoot and root regeneration and acclimatization. This includes the role of epigenesis, genotype and subsequent physiological factors which influence viable protocol development.

Cannabis

Moderator: Cecilia Zapata, Front Range Biosciences

Introduction (C. Zapata)
P-2006 Maintaining a Clonal Gene Bank of Cannabis Synthetic Seeds
Angelo M. Alvarez, CTRFD Plant Science,  and Savanah M. St. Clair
P-2007 Propagation of Marijuana (Cannabis sativa L.) Plantlets from Meristems and Nodal Explants and Identification of Fungal Contaminants in Tissue Culture Using a PCR-based Assay
Danielle Collyer, Simon Fraser University Samantha Lung, and Zamir K. Punja
P-2009 Basal Media Optimization for the Micropropagation and Callogenesis of Cannabis sativa L
S. R. G. Page, University of Guelph, A. Monthony, and A. M. P. Jones
P-2010 Passive CO2 Fertilization and Humidity Regulation for Photoautotrophic Micropropagation of Cannabis sativa L
Marco Pepe, University of Guelph, and A. Maxwell P. Jones
P-2011 Abstract has been withdrawn

Gene Editing

Moderator: Raj Deepika Chauhan, Pairwise

Introduction (R. D. Chauhan)
P-2018 Development of an Efficient Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 System for Gene Editing in Wheat
Hui Chen, Kansas State University, Bin Tian, Yan Liu, Harold N. Trick, and Guihua Bai
P-2021 Development of SPACE Tomatoes: Small Plants for Agriculture in Confined Environments
Marcus Harland-Dunaway, University of California Riverside, Andres Narvaez, Martha Orozco-Cardenas, and Robert Jinkerson
P-2022 CRISPR/Cas9 Under Inducible Expression Systems
Zahra Alizada, University of Arkansas, Bhuvan Pathak, Soumen Nandy, Shan Zhao, and Vibha Srivastava
P-2023 Plant Transformation and Genome Editing Systems for Hexaploid Wheat
Bin Tian, Kansas State University, Hui Chen, Guihua Bai, and Harold N. Trick

In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences

Moderator: Durga Attili, University of Michigan Medical School

Introduction (D. Attili)
A-2000 20-Hydroxyecdysone and Indomethecin Influence Protein Expression in a Spodoptera frugiperda Nervous System Cell Line
Cynthia L. Goodman, USDA/ARS Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory, Yong Wang, Benjamin Buer, Tamra Reall, Susanne Dohn, Joseph Ringbauer, Jr., Sven Geibel, and David Stanley
A-2001 Optimization of a Polarized 2D Differentiated Human Colonoid Transwell Model
Kateryna Karpoff, Caroline L. Mccarthy, The University of Michigan Medical School, Margaret S. Bohm, Ashley J. Cuttitta, Sabrina S. Silvestri, Maliha M. Berner, Jason R. Spence, and Michael K. Dame
A-2002 Dysregulation of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication by Cholesterol and Oysterols
Anthony B. Ketner, Michigan State University, Patricia Christina Blum, Levi Fry, Heather deFeijter-Rupp, Ilce Gabriela Medina Meza, Carlo Barnaba, George S. Abela, Lizbeth Lockwood, and Brad L. Upham
A-2003 Entomopathogenic Fungus Cordyceps tenuipes Inhibited Inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated Macrophages
Jia Xiong, North Carolina State University, Purni Wickramasinghe, John P. Munafo Jr., and Debora Esposito

Symposium to be supported by the Japanese Tissue Culture Association

Conveners: TBD

Balancing Genomics and Genome Editing with Stewardship for Academic Research

Conveners: Wayne Parrott, University of Georgia, and Albert Kausch, University of Rhode Island

Speakers:
Background & Precedents
Wayne Parrott, University of Georgia
Social Contract & Self-policing Scientists
Albert Kausch, University of Rhode Island
Restricting Access Across the Board
Veena Veena, Donald Danforth Center Plant Science Center
Escape from the Lab
Joyce Van Eck, Boyce Thompson Institute
Escape from the Greenhouse
Albert Kausch, University of Rhode Island
Escape During Shipping
Kan Wang, Iowa State University
Mixups During Storage
Heidi Kaeppler, University of Wisconsin
Escape from Field Trials
Heidi Kaeppler, University of Wisconsin

Trust between science and society is essential for society to function. At a time when trust in science is at an all-time low, it is particularly important that scientists show they are responsible citizens and stewards of their plant research materials. Genetic modification remains a controversial topic, more so because it is remarkably easy for transgenes or edited events to ‘escape,’ and the associated press coverage undermines public trust and support for science. Furthermore, they can result in severe disruptions to trade, resulting in billions of dollars in economic losses for the people involved, not to mention financial liability for the scientist and the institution for which they work. Recent breakthroughs in transgenic technology, combined with advances in genome editing, mean that transgenes and edited plants will be more widely available and in more labs than ever before. At the same time, major regulatory rollbacks proposed by USDA will contribute to the perception that relaxed handling of transgenes is permissible, just as improved sequencing technology is making the detection of stray transgenes or genome edits easier than ever before. Therefore, within the context of the social contract that must exist between science and society, this session will highlight common practices that permit event escape, and describe simple, practical solutions for effective event containment.

Imaging Analytics, Artificial Intelligence and Robotics in Tissue Culture and Transformation

Convener:  Yurong Chen, Bayer Crop Science

3:30 Introduction (Y. Chen)
3:35 P-18 Recent Developments in Imaging Analytics, Artificial Intelligence and Robotics
Balathasan Giritharan, Bayer Crop Science
4:05 P-19 Phenomic System for Imaging and Quantification of In Vitro Plant Regeneration and Transformation
Steven Strauss, Oregon State University
4:35 P-20 RoboCut-smarter Propagation, Better Plants
Stephan Von Rundstedt, RoBoTec PTC GmbH

Increasing shooting or transformation frequency through cell biology manipulation, improving consistency and reducing the labor costs are some of the main approaches to improve the tissue culture and transformation production efficiency. Most tissue culture and transformation systems are long and have multiple-stage process involving medium changes and manual transfers or manual cuttings in some applications. Imaging analytics and artificial intelligence can be applied to identify and quantify desirable cultures. Robotics are then used to cut or transfer the desirable cultures to fresh medium. This will help improve consistency, reduce cost, and increase production efficiency. With recent advancements in image sensing and breakthroughs in training deep architectures of neural networks, performance of machine learning has moved closer towards artificial intelligence. Particularly, deep learning has been successfully applied to complex image classification and retrieval tasks. This symposium will focus on the current status and future opportunities of leveraging imaging analytics, artificial intelligence and robotics to improve tissue culture and transformation.

Microbiome in Mammalian Health

Conveners:  Debora Esposito, North Carolina State University, and Mae Ciancio, Midwestern University

3:30 Introduction (D. Esposito and M. Ciancio)
3:35 A-13 Ex Vivo Fecal Fermentations: Biotransformation of Dietary Compounds to Screen for Bioactive Microbial Metabolites
Andrew Neilson, North Carolina State University
4:05 A-14 Mapping the Mucosal Biogeography, Function and Genetics of the Pre-neoplastic Colonic Polyp Microbiome
R. William DePaolo, University of Washington
4:35 A-15 RHost-Microbiome Interaction After Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Reveal Contextual Microbiome Effects
Jonathan Golob, University of Michigan

This symposium will explore the impact of the microbiome on mammalian health and disease from 3 different perspectives. Dr. Andrew Neilson (North Carolina State University) will discuss the biotransformation of dietary compounds with reference to their impact on health and disease, such as metabolic syndrome. Dr. William R. DePaolo (Director of the Center for Microbiome Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Washington) will discuss the localization, function and genetics of the microbiome as it relates to the development of colorectal cancer. Dr. Jonathan Golob (University of Michigan) will describe the use of 2-dimensional human colon organoids to investigate the effect of butyrate on intestinal stem cells with reference to graft-versus-host disease. This session is sure to provide new insights as well as foster new inquiries concerning the microbiome in mammalian health.

Wednesday, June 10

Current Perspectives on Cannabis and Cannabinoids

Conveners: Max Jones, University of Guelph, Katya Boudko, Canopy Growth Corporation, Jeffrey W. Adelberg, Clemson University, and Evan Hill, University of Michigan

8:00 Introduction (M. Jones, K. Boudko, J. W. Adelberg and E. Hill)
8:05 PS-10 Endocannabinoids, Phytocannabinoids and the Brain-gut Axis
John W. Wiley, University of Michigan
8:35 PS-11 Understanding Cannabinoid Biosynthesis and Heterologous Bioengineering by Learning Lessons from Cannabis sativa, Helichrysum umbraculigerum and Radula marginata
Oliver Kayser, Technische Universität Dortmund

Cannabis sativa L. is one of the first medicines known to man. However, evidence-based information on the role of cannabis constituents for human health and well-being has been hampered in modern time by strict prohibition policies. Many of these restrictions are rapidly disappearing in nations across the globe, opening a path for new approaches to bring forward information and products. Our speakers in this session on Current Perspectives on Cannabis and Cannabinoids cut across disciplines of In Vitro Biology to show by example, some of the varied approaches to develop a better understanding of this complex plant. Phytocannabinoids, terpenes, flavins, and other compounds from the cannabis plant are characterized to develop a better understanding of the broad landscape of medicinal, neutraceutical and recreational effects. Phytotherapy and rational clinical research may be supported by bioengineered cannabis or micro-organisms delivering specific compounds, and of special interest, compounds rare in planta. With the availability of high-quality phytochemicals, specific effects on the human gut and their perception by the brain are now elucidated. Transdisciplinary research is well demonstrated in these pursuits.​

Beyond KOs: Emerging Genome Editing Technologies

Conveners: Mary Ann Saltarikos, Bayer U. S. – CropScience, and Aaron Hummel, Pairwise

10:30 Introduction (M. A. Saltarikos and A. Hummel)
10:35 P-21 Investigating the Chemical and Cellular Mechanisms of Base Editing
Alexis Komor, University of California, San Diego
11:05 P-22 Homologous and Non-homologous Somatic Recombination Leads to Genome Remodeling During Clonal Growth of Potato
Luca Comai, University of California, Davis

CRISPR has enabled tremendous progress in basic and applied biology across kingdoms. However, most studies are still using nuclease-mediated, loss of function strategies, focused on single genes in the nuclear genome. In anticipation of the future of the genome editing field, this session will examine new technologies enabling gain of function studies and progress toward upscaling from gene to genome editing. Topics include base editing tools and structural remodeling of the nuclear genome.

Exploring Microbiomes: Application to Humans and Agriculture

Conveners: Rodrigo Sarria, Agbiome, Mae Ciancio, and Kristina Martinez-Guryn, Midwestern University

10:30 Introduction (R. Sarria, M. Ciancio, and K. Martinez-Guryn)
10:35 J-1 Exploring Microbiomes: Application to Humans and Agriculture
Jack Gilbert, University of California, San Diego
11:05 J-2 The Role of Intestinal Fungi in Host Metabolism and Obesity
Joseph F. Pierre, University of Tennessee
11:35 J-3 Partnering with Microbes for Fungicidal Solutions
Ben Holt, AgBiome

The session “Exploring Microbiomes: Application to Humans and Agriculture” is a joint session encompassing both plant and animal researchers and will highlight the importance of applying microbiome research to human health and agriculture. The goal of this session is to build an appreciation for the integral role of environmental and host microorganisms in facilitating physiological processes in humans and plants. The invited speakers are experts that cover a wide range of microbiome research and areas of application including the plant microbiome (Dr. Ben Holt, Core Program Leader – AgBiome Inc.), the fungal microbiome or mycobiome (Dr. Joseph F. Pierre, Assistant Professor – University of Tennessee Health Science Center), and microbial ecology (Jack Gilbert, Professor, University of California San Diego, co-founder of the Earth Microbiome Project and American Gut Project), thus offering comprehensive presentations on microbial ecology and important host-microbe interactions that contribute to health and disease.

Advanced Synthetic Biology Tools for Plant Biotechnology

Conveners: Prakash Kumar, National University of Singapore, Alessandro Occhialini, University of Tennessee, and Lori Marcum, Corteva Agriscience

Speakers:
Scott Lenaghan, University of Tennessee
Cheryl Kerfeld, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and Michigan State University
A Novel Plant Cell-free Synthetic Biology Platform and Its Applications
Krishna Madduri
, Corteva Agriscience

Synthetic biology is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary area that applies engineering principles of design-build-test cycles to synthesize entire new biological organisms or parts. The ability to introduce complex multi-gene pathways into organisms has found many applications in plant biotechnology to generate novel, favorable phenotypes and for production of valuable molecules in plants (vaccines and biofuels are only a few examples). This session will focus on advanced synthetic biology tools for precise engineering of plant cells and organelles. The possibility to perform analysis on single cells and subcellular compartments like plastids has considerably expanded the toolbox of plant synthetic biology. The session will also focus on progress made in design of synthetic plastid genomes and the prospect of assembling new proteinaceous micro-compartments for precise metabolic engineering.