Below is the current program for the 2020 World Congress on In Vitro Biology.

This program is subject to change

Sunday, June 7

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8:00 am – 10:00 am

20/20 on 2020 and Beyond:  Emerging In Vitro Technologies

Conveners: J. Pon Samuel, Corteva Agriscience, Mike Mann, Pairwise, Michael Dame, University of Michigan Medical School, and Durga Attili, University of Michigan Medical School

Speakers:
Modeling the Human Esophagus In Vitro to Understand Racial disparities in the Tissue Response to Carcinogens
Daysha Ferrer Torres, University of Michigan Medical School
Modeling Epithelial-Mesenchymal Plasticity in 3D Epithelial Organoids
Jing Yang, University of California, San Diego

 

 

This session captures the remarkable diversity of innovative in vitro models, recapitulating complex systems across phyla and function. We’ll learn about modeling the process of biomineralization which impacts a vast range of vital processes. Living cells biologically regulate mineral production and deposition as characterized in plant, animal and microbiota. Next, we will explore the diverse molecular landscape of human adult esophagus tissue and the corresponding in vitro derived cultures at the single-cell level. We will discuss how coupling racially diverse patient-derived tissue cultures with high-throughput screens are advancing our understanding of modeling tissue responses to carcinogens. Lastly, organoid models have demonstrated significant potential to explore a multitude of questions to which could not be addressed with previously available cell lines and animal models. 3-D organoids reproduce many of the central aspects of normal and neoplastic growth including polarized expression of differentiation and stem cell markers. These discussions will introduce some exciting new capabilities for the future of in vitro modeling

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10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Best Practices for Plant Tissue Culture

Conveners: Valerie Pence, Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, and Maria Jenderek, USDA-ARS

Speakers:
Conservation of Magnolia Spp Using Cryobiotechnology: From Wild Collection to Ex Vitro Hardening
Raquel Folgado, The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens
Bumps, Potholes and Crashes Along the Way to Successful Micropropagation: Prevention and Intervention
Carolyn Sluis
, Tissue Grown Corporation
Overview of Plant Tissue Culture Media and Practices
Gregory C. Phillips, Arkansas State University

 

While there are many uses for plant tissue culture, there are some practices, principles, and challenges common throughout plant in vitro systems. This session will explore some of these including dealing with contaminants during culture initiation, the characteristics of different media and plant growth regulators, examples of application of these practices to specific plant taxa, as well as some of the major hazards to in vitro work in industry and the strategies for avoiding, minimizing, and overcoming them.

 

Genetic Transformation and Accelerated Breeding in Woody Plant Species

Conveners: Sadanand Dhekney, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Speakers:
Flowering Mechanism in Woody Plants: Manipulation of Blueberry Flowering Pathway Genes for Accelerated Breeding and Yield Increase
Guoqing Song, Michigan State University
Rapid Cycle Breeding of Tree Species
Ann Callahan, USDA-ARS

 

Perennial woody tree species are considered to be recalcitrant to plant regeneration and genetic transformation. The complex genetic background of cultivars makes the transformation very genotype-dependent. Additionally, a long juvenile period for woody plant species makes the breeding of fruit and forest trees more time-consuming compared to the time required for breeding annual crops. It can take more than 15 to 20 years to breed new fruit tree cultivars. Based on modern technologies, flowering mechanism and key genes to shorten tree juvenility have been discovered and utilized in woody plant breeding. Our invited speakers will share their perspective, experience and knowledge in woody plant genetic transformation and accelerated breeding techniques for the development of improved cultivars.

 

Organoid Models: Windows into Human Disorders

Conveners: Durga Attilli, University of Michigan Medical School, and Michael Dame, University of Michigan Medical School

Speakers:
“Gut-in-a-Dish” Model for Developing Personalized Therapies for Chronic Diseases
Soumita Das, University of California, San Diego
From Brain Organoids to Animal Chimera: Novel Platforms for Studying Human Brain Development and Disease
Abed Alfattah Mansour, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Integrative Modeling of Human Brain Development and Neurodevelopment Disorders
Bennett Novitch, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

 

Recent improvements in stem cell technology allow differentiation of pluripotent stem cells derived from patient skin cells to form 3D multicellular organoids to study human development and disease. These techniques advanced the ability to grow stem cell derived brain organoids, “mini brains in a dish”, and offered unparalleled opportunity to study human brain development and mechanisms of disease that previously lacked reliable model systems. In this session, speakers will present data from recently pioneered human brain organoid systems to understand the basis of neurodevelopmental disorders, molecular mechanisms controlling developmental processes, stem/progenitor cell regulation, cell fate decision-making, repair and neuropsychiatric disorders. Finally, work with human gastrointestinal organoids will be presented to demonstrate the novel use of organoid models to develop diagnoses and therapies for a spectrum of chronic gastrointestinal diseases including infectious disease and cancer.Recent improvements in stem cell technology allow differentiation of pluripotent stem cells derived from patient skin cells to form 3D multicellular organoids to study human development and disease. These techniques advanced the ability to grow stem cell derived brain organoids, “mini brains in a dish”, and offered unparalleled opportunity to study human brain development and mechanisms of disease that previously lacked reliable model systems. In this session, speakers will present data from recently pioneered human brain organoid systems to understand the basis of neurodevelopmental disorders, molecular mechanisms controlling developmental processes, stem/progenitor cell regulation, cell fate decision-making, repair and neuropsychiatric disorders. Finally, work with human gastrointestinal organoids will be presented to demonstrate the novel use of organoid models to develop diagnoses and therapies for a spectrum of chronic gastrointestinal diseases including infectious disease and cance

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1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

New Approach Methods for Drug Discovery in Japan
Sponsored by the JSAAE and JTCA

Conveners: Hajime Kojima, National Institute of Health Sciences, and Yohei Hayashi, RIKEN Bioresource Research Center

Speakers:
Collagen Vitrigel Membrane Useful for Fabricating Three-dimensional Culture Models and Their Application to the Development of Test Methods for Predicting ADME/Tox of Chemicals
Toshiaki Takezawa, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
Drug Discovery Using Disease-specific iPS Cell Collection in RIKEN Cell Bank
Yohei Hayashi, RIKEN Bioresource Research Center
Development of Novel Drug Safety Assessments Using Human iPS Cell Technology
Yasunari Kanda, National Institute of Health Sciences
Consideration Points for the Development of Microphysiological System
Seiichi Ishida, National Institute of Health Sciences

 

Seeking to become a global leader in the field of stem cell technology since Dr. S. Yamanaka’s Novel prize on the development of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) in 2012, the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED) has provided support for the research and development into clinical application of regenerative medicine and a useful tool for conducting risk assessments of drug candidates with stem cell technology. In this symposium, we focus the projects on drug discovery with hiPSC under the Japanese funding agency and introduce the current researches of new safety pharmacology test, new scaffolds for the cells, patient-derived iPSC bank and the Microphysiological Systems (MPS).

Plan(t)s for the Future Planet

Conveners: Pierluigi Barone, Corteva Agriscience, and Todd J. Jones, Corteva Agriscience

Speakers:
Deciphering the Molecular and Cellular Development of a C4 Photosynthetic Leaf
Tammy Sage, University of Toronto
Harnessing Plant Biology to Address Climate Change
Wolfgang Busch, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Engineering the Nitrogen-fixing Nodulation Trait Using Legumes and the Tropical Parasponia Tree (Cannabaceae) as Templates
Rene Geurts,
Wageningen University & Research

 

In the coming decades agricultural production faces tremendous challenges in terms of productivity growth and natural resource use efficiency and environmental stewardship. The increased demand for food and feed associated with climatic changes will require the development of plants able to use fertilizers more efficiently, remove more carbon from the environment, and maintain soil and water quality. In this symposium our speakers will share some of the most recent efforts to translate advances in applied plant biology and biotechnology to accelerate crop improvement and sustainability.

 

In Vitro Technologies for Clean Plant Production in Cannabis

Conveners: Max Jones, University of Guelph, and Hemant Lata, Mississippi State University

Speakers:
Ignorance is Bliss? An Overview of Diseases Affecting Cannabis
David Joly, Université de Moncton
Advances in Micropropagation of Cannabis
Max Jones, University of Guelph

In Vitro Technologies for Clean Plant Production in Cannabis
Jeremy Warren, Dark Heart Nursery

 

Throughout the history, medicinal plants have been used as a traditional medicine for the prevention and treatment of variety of illnesses. However, developing a natural product as a modern, single molecule drug faces a lot of challenges from farm to pharmaceuticals. It needs batch to batch consistency in its biomass product and in secondary metabolites. Cannabis, being a dioceous and highly heterozygous plant, in terms of its botany and chemistry, faces some unusual extra challenges. To maintain the consistency in cannabis biomass product, male plants are removed from the growing area and only high yielding female plants are maintained for the future propagation. In this process, micropropagation can play an important role in mass-propagation of cannabis while maintaining the consistency in secondary metabolites. In this session, cannabis botany, its propagation using conventional and advance biotechnological techniques and the challenges in cultivation of a medical grade cannabis will be discussed.

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3:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Opening Ceremony and Keynote Symposium

Emergence of Spontaneous Oscillatory Networks from Human Brain Organoids

Keynote Speaker: Alysson R. Muotri, Professor, Sanford Consortium, University of California, San Diego

The complexity of the human brain, with thousands of neuronal types, permits the development of sophisticated behavioral repertoires, such as language, tool use, self-awareness, symbolic thought, cultural learning and consciousness. Understanding what produces neuronal diversification during brain development has been a longstanding challenge for neuroscientists and may bring insights into the evolution of human cognition. Human pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types, such as neurons and glia. Moreover, induced pluripotent stem cells can be achieved from living individuals by reprogramming somatic cells that would capture their entire genome in a pluripotent state. From these pluripotent state, it is possible to generate models of the human brain, such as brain organoids. We have been using brain-model technology (BMT) to gain insights on several biological processes, such as human neurodevelopment and evolution. We also applied BMT to measure the impact of genetic variants in autism spectrum disorders and for evolutionary studies. The reconstruction of human synchronized network activity in a dish can help to understand how neural network oscillations might contribute to the social brain. Our findings suggest a potential bridge to the gap between the microscale in vitro neural networks electrophysiology and non-invasive electroencephalogram.

Monday, June 8

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8:00 am – 10:00 am

Frontiers in Single Cell Technologies

Conveners: Yun Yue, Corteva Agriscience, Brad Upham, Michigan State University, Pon Samuel, Corteva Agriscience, Bretton Hale, Arkansas State University, and Joshua Z. Gasiorowski, Midwestern University

Speaker:
10X Genomics Tools for Studying Biology at True Resolution
Nicole Abreu, 10X Genomics
Application of Single Nuclei Transcriptomics to Assess the Hepatic Effects of Dioxin
Rance Nault, Michigan State University
Microproteomic Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Cell Protrusions
Karine Gousset, California State University Fresno

 

Multicellular organisms, including plants and animals, are integrated into a cellular hierarchy, which is comprised of cell syncitia that are further organized into tissues forming unique organs with specialized functions allowing the existence of an organism. The regulation of gene expression ultimately determines the type and function of cells and tissues. Due to a lack of technologies, past research often had to rely on measurements in bulk populations of cells within tissues to study gene expression, cell function, and tissue physiology. However, recent advances in single-cell technologies are becoming essential tools to unmask the heterogeneity of cell functions within a tissue. As noted, most of our scientific knowledge generally stemmed from population data where we consider cells belonging to the same subtype as a single unit, in which all the members that compose the class are, by definition, homogeneous and identical. This concept represents an extreme simplification of reality, which can be attributed both to the necessary simplification required to understand the global picture and also to the lack of past technologies and data analysis techniques that allow more fine‐grained investigations. The absence of technologies for studying single cells has had the most significant impact on the analysis of cells that occur as a minimal fraction of the initial population: such as stem cells. Recent advances in single-cell technologies are now allowing the study of single cells or cell types for different phenotypic markers simultaneously. In plants, individual gametophytic cells are reprogramed to produce haploid embryoids that can be doubled to generate di-haploids. This technology has helped plant breeders accelerate improving many of the food crops. In mammalian systems, these new single-cell technologies are transforming our fundamental understanding of how individual cells play unique roles within the tissue and will lead to many breakthroughs in understanding the many pathologies affecting human health. In this session, we will showcase a few examples of single-cell technologies powering fundamental research on the cell heterogeneity of tissues.

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10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Plant Biotechnology Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition

Moderator: Carlos H. Garcia, CTC Genomics

To support the Society’s vision to encourage education and scientific informational exchange and recognize outstanding post docs, the Plant Biotechnology Section is pleased to announce the 2020 Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition. Post-Doctoral Candidates wishing to participate in this competition should submit a copy of their abstract with its title and submission ID number to Carlos Hernandez-Garcia and check that option when they submit their abstract. Competition finalists will be selected based on the quality of the abstracts. The abstract should address the following: Background, Objectives, Methods, Results, Discussion and Conclusions. Where appropriate, the methods section should include a description of how reproducible results were ensured. The abstract must not include references. The abstract text must not exceed 1800 characters. A panel of judges will evaluate the presentations at the meeting. Criteria for the evaluation include experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, appearance and ability of the post-doctoral candidate to present it. Winners will be presented with a certificate and a cash award at the meeting. Please note that the DEADLINE to submit your abstract for the SIVB Oral Presentation Competition is January 31, 2020.

Plant Biotechnology Student Oral Presentation Competition

Moderator: Veena Veena, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

To support the Society’s vision to encourage education and scientific informational exchange and recognize outstanding post docs, the Plant Biotechnology Section is pleased to announce the 2020 Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition. Competition finalists were selected based on the quality of the abstracts. A panel of judges will evaluate the presentations at the meeting. Criteria for the evaluation include experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, appearance and ability of the post-doctoral candidate to present it. Winners will be presented with a certificate and a cash award at the meeting.

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12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Student Networking Luncheon

Conveners: Cristofer Calvo, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and Bretton Hale, Arkansas State University

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1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition

Moderators: Kolla Kristjansdottir, Midwestern University, and Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University

 

The In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences Section (IVACS) of the Society for In Vitro Biology is pleased to announce the 2020 Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition during the World Congress on In Vitro Biology. This competition encourages the exchange of scientific information between the presenters, attendees and judges, and provides an invaluable opportunity for students and post-docs to enhance their presentation delivery and public speaking skills. The top three finalists were selected for the competition based on the quality of their abstracts, as well as the merit of their research and scientific findings. During the Oral Presentation Competition session, a panel of expert judges will grade the presentations. Evaluation criteria will include: experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, professionalism and ability of the finalist to explain the research and answer questions, and importantly, adherence to the allocated time for the presentation. The Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition session serves to recognize and reward the research and achievements of outstanding students and talented post-docs. Therefore, the three finalists will be presented with a certificate and a cash award during the World Congress.

Digital Agriculture – Sensors, Machine Learning and Image Analysis

Conveners: Randall P. Niedz, USDA, and Kan Wang, Iowa State University

Speakers:
Image Analysis and Machine Learning
Beth Cimini, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
In Vitro Data Collection Using Image Analysis and Machine Learning
Randall Niedz, U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, USDA
Precision  Agriculture Sensors
Liang Dong, Iowa State University

 

A large number of devices/sensors exist that provide a quantitative and objective representation of the plant, in planta and ex planta, and its environment. Many of these devices elucidate properties, often in real-time, either not visible to the human eye or otherwise impossible or difficult to quantify without these devices. These devices typically generate large amounts of data, and software is required to collect, organize, and analyze these large data sets. The combination of these devices and software is redefining what is meant by “field observable” properties. The results include precision agriculture where all aspects of crop production are controlled more accurately, and agricultural research where these measures provide a new level of detail that is furthering our understanding of the genetic x environment interactions and the complexity that characterizes biological systems. The technological goal is the precise monitoring, quantification, and control of all aspects of plant growth and development. The session will discuss sensor technology, including microsensors for real-time individual plant phenotyping, the principles and advances in image analysis and machine learning, and the collection and use of data obtained by machine learning image analysis in classical and DOE plant tissue culture experiments.

MicroRNA and Cellular Dysfunction

Conveners:  Jeff Kwak, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Michael Fay, Midwestern University

Speakers:
MiR-145 Mediates Cell Morphology-regulated Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation to Smooth Muscle Cells
Yi-Ting Yeh, University of California San Diego
Local and Systemic Effects of Cancer-secreted Extracellular miRNA
Shizhen (Emily) Wang, University of California, San Diego
Role of MicroRNAs in Hematopoietic Development and Cancer
Dinesh Rao, UCLA Health

 

 

MicroRNAs in Hematopoeitic Development and Cancer
Dinesh Rao, UCLA Health

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20-25 nt) non-coding RNAs that block gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. It is estimated that the expression of over 50% of mammalian protein coding genes are regulated by miRNAs, and a single miRNA may regulate expression of hundreds of mRNAs. Since the discovery of miRNAs, there has been great interest in determining the roles of miRNAs in regard to cellular function and dysfunction. This symposium will focus on the roles of non-coding RNAs with an emphasis on cancer and differentiation.

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5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Advances in Plant, Cell, Tissue, and Organ Culture Contributed Paper Session

Moderator: Nagesh Sardesai, Corteva Agriscience

IVACS Contributed Paper Session

Moderator: James Varani, University of Michigan Medical School

Plant Contributed Paper Session

Moderator: Ming Cheng, Pairwise

Tuesday, June 9

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8:00 am – 10:00 am

Bioethics and Public Policy for Benefits and Concerns in Plants and Animals

Conveners:  Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University, and Kenneth Kandaras, International Foundation for Ethical Research

Speaker:
Bioethics and Public Policy for Benefits and Concerns in Plants and Animals
David Resnik,
 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

 

Bioethics began as a multi-disciplinary field of study that has significantly developed since the 1970s. It is an integrated field in which moral and ethical discussions and views of new developments in the life sciences arena – including technology, biotechnology, medicine, biology, and environmental sciences – are combined with social sciences, including philosophy, theology, law, and public policies. On one hand, the Bioethics field examines the ways in which new medicines, biomedical procedures and interventions, as well as genetic modifications of plants and animals, can benefit millions of peoples, the humankind and the environment, as a whole. On the other hand, Bioethics carefully examines and deliberates ethical questions about the potential risks and harms that these innovations and groundbreaking advancements, as well as their inadvertent and inappropriate use, may cause. Additionally, Bioethics provides an important platform for bringing to light different perspectives of public awareness and general understanding of the topics in debate, as well as the viewpoints of various individuals and populations that could be directly affected by the resulted public policies. With the rapid advances in agricultural and biomedical technologies, ethical and moral questions involving the implementation of these advances become more complex. Some of the well-known topics that spurred extensive news media of public and ethical concerns, and meaningful public debates relate to industrial, agriculture and farm practice, animal welfare and rights in food production and biomedical research, and commercial cultivation of genetically modified crops. This Plenary session will highlight some of the bioethical perspectives of benefits and concerns in plants and animals, and their contributions to the generation of public policies.

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10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Emulating Human Liver in Preclinical Research and Regenerative Medicine

Conveners: Seyoum Ayehunie, MatTek Corporation, and John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting

Speakers:
Mechanistic Insight and Prediction of Drug-induced Organ Injury for Humans
Alison EM Vickers, Human Translational Models, LLC
An In Vitro Model of Human Fatty Liver Disease
Aras Mattis, University of California, San Francisco

A chronic problem in pharmaceutical development has been the frequency that candidate compounds fail in clinical trials due to unexpected hepatic toxicity. In these cases, the preclinical testing in animal models had failed to identify a selective human toxicity. In addition, there is a growing need to model human liver damage such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (fatty liver disease) which is now driving a majority of liver transplantation cases. In vitro liver tissue models are gaining importance for safety and efficacy prediction of pharmacological research and disease modeling. Obtaining primary liver cells on a continuous basis is difficult at best. To overcome these limitations, emerging technologies provide alternative liver cell source including inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for in vitro predictive models for liver physiology and functionality.  Such models would allow for the study of hepatotoxicity, xenobiotic metabolism and selective organ degeneration. The challenge has been compounded by the limited availability of donor organs, multiple cells types to address within the liver and the rapid reduction in xenobiotic metabolic competence (p450 activity) with time in traditional culture. To address these challenges, 3D culture systems have been developed to allow maintenance of normal cell shape and interaction. In some cases, multiple cell types can be incorporated. These and other features of the models allow the maintenance of some degree of p450 activity. This symposium will feature three approaches to address the promise and challenges in the development of physiologically functional 3D liver cell cultures. These presentations will include liver slide culture from mature liver, bioprinting of 3D structures from component cell types and development of iPSC-derived hepatocytes for research and regenerative medicine.
 

Plant Memory: The Importance of Assessing Culture Carry Over Effects During Micropropagation Protocol Development

Conveners: Michael E. Kane, University of Florida, and Ben Hughes, AG3, Inc

An Overview of Epigenesis in In Vitro Cultured Plants
Clelia De-la-Peña Seaman, Unidad de Biotecnología
Plant Growth Regulator Carry-Over Effects on the Micropropagation Process
Michael Kane, University of Florida
Challenges in the Micropropagation of Woody Species
Reid Robinson and Micah E. Stevens, Sierra Gold Nursery

 

Reliable commercially-viable micropropagation protocols must be designed for consistent and efficient upscaled production of genetically stable and vigorous young plants possessing specialized traits. In previous SIVB symposia, important emphasis has been placed on improving culture media using Design of Experiment (DOE) procedures. Success in developing sustainable micropropagation protocols also requires an understanding of factors influencing plant responses in vitro including initiation, shoot and root regeneration and acclimatization. During this session the role of epigenesis, genotype and subsequent physiological factors influencing viable micropropagation protocol development will be presented.

Imaging Analytics, Artificial Intelligence and Robotics in Tissue Culture and Transformation

Convener:  Yurong Chen, Bayer Crop Science

Speakers:
Recent Developments in Imaging Analytics, Artificial Intelligence and Robotics
Balathasan Giritharan, Bayer Crop Science
Phenomic System for Imaging and Quantification of In Vitro Plant Regeneration and Transformation
Steven Strauss, Oregon State University
RoboCut-smart Propagation, Better Plants
Stephan von Rundstedt, BOCK Bio Science GmbH

Increasing shooting or transformation frequency through cell biology manipulation, improving consistency and reducing the labor costs are some of the main approaches to improve the tissue culture and transformation production efficiency. Most tissue culture and transformation systems are long and have multiple-stage process involving medium changes and manual transfers or manual cuttings in some applications. Imaging analytics and artificial intelligence can be applied to identify and quantify desirable cultures. Robotics are then used to cut or transfer the desirable cultures to fresh medium. This will help improve consistency, reduce cost, and increase production efficiency. With recent advancements in image sensing and breakthroughs in training deep architectures of neural networks, performance of machine learning has moved closer towards artificial intelligence. Particularly, deep learning has been successfully applied to complex image classification and retrieval tasks. This symposium will focus on the current status and future opportunities of leveraging imaging analytics, artificial intelligence and robotics to improve tissue culture and transformation.

Microbiome in Mammalian Health

Conveners:  Debora Esposito, North Carolina State University, and Mae Ciancio, Midwestern University

Speakers:
Ex Vivo Fecal Fermentations: Biotransformation of Dietary Compounds to Screen for Bioactive Microbial Metabolites
Andrew Neilson, North Carolina State University
Mapping the Mucosal Biogeography, Function and Genetics of the Pre-neoplastic Colonic Polyp Microbiome
R. William DePaolo, University of Washington
Jonathan Golob, University of Michigan

This symposia will explore the impact of the microbiome on mammalian health and disease from 3 different perspectives. Dr. Andrew Neilson (North Carolina State University) will discuss the biotransformation of dietary compounds with reference to their impact on health and disease, such as metabolic syndrome. Dr. William R. DePaolo (Director of the Center for Microbiome Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Washington) will discuss the localization, function and genetics of the microbiome as it relates to the development of colorectal cancer. Dr. Jonathan Golob (University of Michigan) will describe the use of 2 dimensional human colon organoids to investigate the effect of butyrate on intestinal stem cells with reference to graft-versus-host disease. This session is sure to provide new insights as well as foster new inquiries concerning the microbiome in mammalian health.

Wednesday, June 10

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8:00 am – 10:00 am

Current Perspectives on Cannabis and Cannabinoids

Conveners: Max Jones, University of Guelph, Katya Boudko, Canopy Growth Corporation, Jeffrey W. Adelberg, Clemson University, and Evan Hill, University of Michigan

Speakers:
Endocannabinoids, Phytocannabinoids and the Brain-gut Axis
John W. Wiley, University of Michigan
Learning Lessons from Cannabis sativa, Helichrysum umbraculigerum and Radula marginata
Oliver Kayser, Technische Universität Dortmund

 

Cannabis sativa L. is one of the first medicines known to man. However, evidence-based information on the role of cannabis constituents for human health and well-being has been hampered in modern time by strict prohibition policies. Many of these restrictions are rapidly disappearing in nations across the globe, opening a path for new approaches to bring forward information and products. Our speakers in this session on Current Perspectives on Cannabis and Cannabinoids cut across disciplines of In Vitro Biology to show by example, some of the varied approaches to develop a better understanding of this complex plant. Phytocannabinoids, terpenes, flavins, and other compounds from the cannabis plant are characterized to develop a better understanding of the broad landscape of medicinal, neutraceutical and recreational effects. Phytotherapy and rational clinical research may be supported by bioengineered cannabis or micro-organisms delivering specific compounds, and of special interest, compounds rare in planta. With the availability of high-quality phytochemicals, specific effects on the human gut and their perception by the brain are now elucidated. Transdisciplinary research is well demonstrated in these pursuits.

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10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Exploring Microbiomes: Application to Humans and Agriculture

Conveners: Rodrigo Sarria, Agbiome and Kristina Martinez-Guryn, Midwestern University

Speakers:
Exploring Microbiomes: Application to Humans and Agriculture
Jack Gilbert, University of California, San Diego
Joseph F. Pierre, University of Tennessee
Ben Holt, AgBiome Inc.

 

The session “Exploring Microbiomes: Application to Humans and Agriculture” is a joint session encompassing both plant and animal researchers and will highlight the importance of applying microbiome research to human health and agriculture. The goal of this session is to build an appreciation for the integral role of environmental and host microorganisms in facilitating physiological processes in humans and plants. The invited speakers are experts that cover a wide range of microbiome research and areas of application including the plant microbiome (Dr. Ben Holt, Core Program Leader – AgBiome Inc.), the fungal microbiome or mycobiome (Dr. Joseph F. Pierre, Assistant Professor – University of Tennessee Health Science Center), and microbial ecology (Jack Gilbert, Professor, University of California San Diego, co-founder of the Earth Microbiome Project and American Gut Project), thus offering comprehensive presentations on microbial ecology and important host-microbe interactions that contribute to health and disease.

Beyond KOs: Emerging Genome Editing Technologies

Conveners: Mary Ann Saltarikos, Bayer U. S. – CropScience, and Aaron Hummel, Pairwise

Speakers:
Investigating the Chemical and Cellular Mechanisms of Base Editing
Alexis Komor, University of California, Davis
Homologous and Non-homologous Somatic Recombination Leads to Genome Remodeling During Clonal Growth of Potato
Luca Comai,University of California, Davis

CRISPR has enabled tremendous progress in basic and applied biology across kingdoms. However, most studies are still using nuclease-mediated, loss of function strategies, focused on single genes in the nuclear genome. In anticipation of the future of the genome editing field, this session will examine new technologies enabling gain of function studies and progress toward upscaling from gene to genome editing. Topics include base editing tools and structural remodeling of the nuclear genome.

 

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