Final Program

Below is the program for the 2023 In Vitro Biology Meeting.

Items with an asterisk (*) are scheduled for inclusion as part of the On-Demand Limited Access

To view the posters , virtual posters, and silent abstracts, please click here

Saturday, June 10

Registration
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7:00 AM - 7:00 PM

4TH FLOOR REGISTRATION

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8:00 AM - 11:30 AM

PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOP

GRANBY SALONS DE

Grow with the Flow: Advanced Flow Cytometry and Applications

Conveners: J. Pon Samuel, Corteva Agriscience, and Jeff Beringer, Inari Agriculture

8:00 Introduction (J. P. Samuel and J. Beringer)
8:05 E-1 Flow Cytometry Methods and Modern Devices for Single Cell Sorting and Enriching Applications
James F. Leary, Aurora Life Technologies, LLC
8:45 E-2 Cytometry and Microscopy to Multi-Omics Applications and the Future of Spatial Context in Biology
Mayandi Sivaguru, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
9:45 Coffee Break
10:00 E-3 Amnis Imaging Flow Cytometry: A Picture is Worth a Thousand Histograms
Rob Thacker, Cytek Biosciences
10:45 Panel discussion:

Panelists:
James F. Leary, Aurora Life Technologies, LLC
Mayandi Sivaguru, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Rob Thacker, Cytek Biosciences

There are several advances made in flow cytometry in recent years, including new sorting techniques using DEP. And the development of microfluidic devices.  Some examples of modern flow cytometry methods for cell sorting include Label-free sorting, Mass cytometry, and Image stream cytometry. We will show case Image stream cytometry that combines the speed and sensitivity of flow cytometry with the ability to capture high-resolution images of individual cells. These images can be used to analyze the cells in greater detail and to identify specific features or structures within the cells. In addition, image stream cytometry is a powerful tool for cell analysis, as it allows researchers to combine the quantitative data provided by flow cytometry with the visual information provided by microscopy. It can be used to study a wide range of cell types and phenomena, including cell signaling, cell migration, and cell-cell interactions. Image stream cytometry is also well suited for high-throughput cell analysis, as it can process thousands of cells per second and generate a large amount of data in a short amount of time. Experts in the modern flow cytometry will be presenting and available to discuss on various cytometers including Amnis ® ImageStream ® cytometery, and Microfluidic devices and its advantages over traditional cytometer.

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8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

FUSION

SIVB Board of Directors Meeting
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12:00 PM – 4:30 PM

PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOP

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Principles and Best Practices for Plant Genome Engineering Workshop*

Conveners: Pierluigi Barone, Corteva Agriscience; Yiping Qi, University of Maryland; and Joyce Van Eck, The Boyce Thompson Institute

12:00 PlantGENE Introduction
12:05 Panel Discussion on Plant Transformation

Panelists:
Bill Gordon-Kamm, Corteva Agriscience
Heidi Kaeppler, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Keunsub Lee, Iowa State University
Wayne Parrott, University of Georgia
Nigel Taylor, Danforth Plant Science Center
Joyce Van Eck, The Boyce Thompson Institute
Veena Veena, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

2:00 Coffee Break
2:30 Introduction (Y. Qi)
2:35 P-1 Multiplexed CRISPR-Cas9 and CRISPR-Cas12a Systems for Genome Editing in Plants
Gen Li, University of Maryland
3:30 P-2 CRISPR-combo Systems for Simultaneous Genome Editing and Gene Activation
Hong Fang, University of Maryland
4:25 Discussion

Part 1:
Despite its usefulness, genome editing is not always easy to implement, especially when there are crop-specific considerations. A critical part of genome engineering is first mastering the methods for plant tissue culture and transformation. Therefore, the first half of this workshop will cover the best practices for these critical steps. We will address how to increase success for working with established systems and how to develop systems for new species. The PlantGENE Steering Committee will lead the discussion, with workshop attendees being strongly encouraged to share their knowledge. Prior to the workshop, a survey will be sent to solicit ideas for discussion items that are of the greatest interest to attendees.

Part 2:
The second half will focus on using state-of-the-art CRISPR genome engineering tools in plants.  It will start with design, construction, and application of multiplexed CRISPR-Cas9 and base editing systems.  Next the focus will shift to the design, construction, and application of CRISPR-Combo systems to boost plant genome editing through simultaneous gene activation. These presentations will cover the backgrounds and principles of the technologies, with details provided on vector design and construction, optional assessment in protoplasts, and analysis of transformed protoplasts and stable lines for identification of edited events. All the vectors, analysis tools, and data sets used in the workshop are publicly available.

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3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

1783

2023 Program Planning Committee Meeting
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4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

FUSION

Finance Committee Meeting
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5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

President's Suite

Student Reception
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7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

MAIN SALONS ABCD

2023 In Vitro Biology Meeting Welcome Reception
Tomatoes donated courtesy of
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7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

MAIN SALONS ABCD

Mermaid City Silent Auction Kickoff
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7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

MAIN SALONS ABCD

Poster Session
Even poster authors will present
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8:30 PM – 10:00 PM

PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOP

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Design of Experiment (DoE) Workshop – Part II (Mixture Designs; R Statistical Software)*

Conveners: Randall P. Niedz, USDA, and Uyen Cao Chu, Corteva Agriscience

8:30 Introduction (U. Cao Chu)
8:35 P-3 DoE Mixture Designs
Randall P. Niedz, USDA/ARS
9:05 P-4 Using R Statistical Software for DoE
Brett Gytri, Tissue-Grown Corporation
9:35 Discussion

Determining optimal formulations and conditions for improved in vitro growth is often done by testing one ingredient or set of conditions at a time. Design of Experiment (DoE) methodology is a particularly useful set of techniques that allows simultaneous testing of multiple compounds, processes, or environmental conditions in multiplex systems. The principles and statistics behind DoE are complex, and proper experiment design and data analysis rely on computer programs designed specifically for DoE applications. In this workshop, two topics will be presented.  First, the principles and tools to apply DoE to mixture and mixture-amount experiments will be discussed.  Second, we will demonstrate how to set up and use the free open-source R statistical software for DoE.

Sunday, June 11

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7:00 AM - 5:30 PM

4TH FLOOR REGISTRATION

Registration
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7:00 AM - 8:00 AM

Paul D. Fraim

In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences Program Committee Meeting
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8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

PLENARY SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Diversity in Science*

Conveners: Veena Veena, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Allison Songstad, NanoString Technologies, Inc., and Jasmyn Hoeger, University of Iowa

8:00 Introduction (V. Veena)
8:05 PS-1 Women in STEM: Advice I Would Give My Younger Self
Allison Songstad, NanoString Technologies, Inc.
8:40 PS-2 Empowering Diversity in STEM: Journey to STEM from a Non-Traditional Agricultural Background
Jasmyn Hoeger, University of Iowa
9:15 PS-3 Your Experience, Your Story, So Tell It!
Amber Maynard, Corteva Agriscience
9:50 Discussion

This session will focus on diversity and inclusion in the STEM workspace and education environments. A panel of speakers will share their experiences in these environments and provide advice and resources to help bring awareness to diversity and inclusion in STEM. The session will conclude with an open Q&A forum to digest the discussed topics.

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10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Main Salons ABCD

Coffee Break
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10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Fusion

Long Range Planning Committee Meeting
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10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

1783

Public Policy Committee Meeting

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

GRANBY SALONS ABC

Fostering Crop Resilience through Biotech, Breeding, Sensory Biology to Adapt to Changing Ecosystems

Conveners: Heqiang `Alfred` Huo, University of Florida, Huixia Wu, Ball Helix, Christopher Bagley, Inari, and Veena Veena, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

10:30 Introduction (H. Wu, C. Bagley, and V. Veena)
10:35 P-5 Engineering Plant Vascular Tissues for Yield, Nutrient, and Stress Improvement
Cankui Zhang, Purdue University
11:00 P-6 Towards Robust Crops Under Environmental Adversities
Hong Luo, Clemson University
11:25 P-7

A Multifaceted Approach to Understanding Peach Dormancy: From Biochemical Pathways to Genes and Climate Change Implications
Sherif M. Sherif, Virginia Tech, Protiva Das, Jianyang Liu, and Md Tabibul Islam

11:50 P-8 Manipulating miR164 and STAY-GREEN 1 to Mitigate Environmental Effect on Lettuce Postharvest Quality
Heqiang ‘Alfred’ Huo, University of Florida
12:15 Discussion

Extreme climate variations happen more frequently due to climate change, and agriculture faces these enormously fluctuating conditions accompanied by unpredictable abiotic and biotic stresses. The unfavorable environments and dwindling resources such as farmland and gene pools because of the ever-increasing global population and rapid urbanization are one of the most difficult challenges of this century. Classical breeding approaches such as hybridization breeding and mutation breeding have been extensively used for developing climate-resilient crops. At the same time, there have been many successful attempts to improve crop resilience through advanced biotechnology techniques and molecular genetics approaches. This session aims to update the research progress on the application of various biotechnology strategies to improve the stress-resilience of crops; the presentation topics will cover the basic understanding of the mechanism underlying the responses to environmental stresses (temperature, light, drought and salinity etc.) and practical application of novel technologies for improving plant performance in the changing environments.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Organoid Modeling of Complex Systems: From Novel to Necessity*

Conveners: Michael K. Dame, University of Michigan Medical School, and Durga Attili, University of Michigan Medical School

10:30 Introduction (M. K. Dame and D. Attilli)
10:35 A-1 A Cell Atlas of the Pediatric Human Lung Aligns In Vitro Differentiation Strategies to Human Lung Development
Tristan Frum, University of Michigan Medical School
11:10 A-2 Pig Outside a Pig – Disease Modelling and Welfare
Matheus Costa, University of Saskatchewan
11:45 A-3 Generation of Regionally Defined Brain Organoids
In-Hyun Park, Yale Stem Cell Center
12:20 Discussion

 

Organoids provide an invaluable tool to explore organ-specific, and importantly, species-specific questions. This is due to their ability to self-organize and accurately recapitulate defining tissue phenotypes. Further, organoids can now be directed to preserve region-specific characteristics of an organ system, via preservation of the source tissue or through directed differentiation. This model has become an essential translational tool to understand both basic biology and disease, having important implications not only in human but also in the welfare of agricultural livestock. This session will share exciting insights into three diverse systems: human brain, microbiota-host interactions in pig intestine, and human pediatric lung development.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

GRANBY SALONS DE

Strategic Crops for Food Security in Underserved Regions

Conveners: Todd Jones, Corteva Agriculture, and Brigitte Weston, Gates Ag One

10:30 Introduction (T. J. Jones and B. Weston)
10:35 P-9 New Plant Breeding Technologies for Accelerating Genetic Gains for Under-utilized Crops
Pooja Bhatnagar-Mathur, FAO/IAEA
11:10 P-10 Delivering Cassava (Manihot esculenta) with RNAi-mediated Resistance to Cassava Brown Streak Disease to Benefit East African Smallholder Farmers
Nigel Taylor, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
11:45 P-11 TBD
12:20 Discussion

Several consequences of climate change are unpredictable weather patterns, extremes in temperature and inconsistent rainfall. These conditions create stress on food production systems and require adaptation to provide the necessary food and fiber for an ever-growing population.  One strategy to address the challenges of climate change is to increase crop diversity to improve the resiliency of food systems in these regions. This session will explore the current state of enabling technologies for crop improvement in under-utilized food crop species in regions most impacted by climate change, Sub Saharan Africa and South Asia.  Speakers will focus on strategic crops for food security in these regions such as: cassava, tef, cowpea, mung bean, yams, banana, ground nuts, pearl millet, potatoes and sorghum.  Speakers will discuss current capabilities, identify technology gaps and explore future opportunities for improving the impact of these under-utilized food crops.

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12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

EDUCATION WORKSHOP

GRANBY SALONS ABC

Student Networking Luncheon: Effectively Communicating Research to the Non-Scientific Community

Conveners: Jasmyn M. Hoeger, University of Iowa, and Christina Yevtushenko, McGill University

12:30 Introduction (J. M. Hoeger and C. Yevtushenko)
12:35 E-4 Effectively Communicating Research to the Non-Scientific Community
Liz Gray, Virginia Tech
1:00 Discussion

It is clear that people want to learn about science, but when research articles are filled with jargon and acronyms, it can be easy to get lost in an unwelcoming vocabulary that seems to require experience in a niche subject. Breaking down the hurdles to better communicate science to the non-scientific community has an important and powerful role: empowering, encouraging, and educating. How can scientists make their work as clear as possible? How can a bigger audience be reached? How can a message be accurately conveyed? This year’s student luncheon speaker from Virginia Tech’s Center for Communicating Science will shine light on common mistakes scientists make when writing a paper for a broad audience. Learn how to strengthen communication skills, simplify without losing information, and write outside the mindset of a scientist.

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12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Fusion

Publications Committee Meeting
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12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Main Salons ABCD

Exhibitors Refreshment Break
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1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

GRANBY SALONS DE

Advances in Micropropagation Including Specialty Crops

Conveners: Micah E. Stevens, Sierra Gold Nurseries, and Pamela Vogel, Pairwise

1:30 Introduction (M. E. Stevens and P. Vogel)
1:35 P-12 Advances in the Micropropagation of Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus) at Northwest Plant Company
Francine Farias Soares, Northwest Plant Company
2:00 P-13 Plant Cell Culture Based Micropropagation Platform with Innovative Cryo Cell Banking Technology
Weiming Wang
, ArborGen, Inc.
2:25 P-14 TBD
Whitney D. Phillips, PhylaTech, LLC

 

Tissue culture micropropagation is invaluable for the rapid clonal production of elite plant genetics. As new climatic and biotic challenges arise it is increasingly important to be able to identify novel techniques and crops in which to meet these demands. Plant tissue culture is uniquely positioned to meet the needs of 21st century horticulture, forestry, conservation, medicinal, and agriculture industries. In this section we will cover up-to-date research, technologies, and applied knowledge for a number of different specialty crops.

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1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

PAUL D. FRAIM

Chemoprevention

Conveners: Brad L. Upham, Michigan State University, and Michael J. Fay, Midwestern University

1:30 Introduction (M. J. Fay)
1:35 A-4 In Vitro Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Bioassays for Identifying Chemopreventive Agents
Brad. L. Upham, Michigan State University
2:00 A-5 KEAP1-NRF2 Signaling: A Target for Cancer Chemoprevention
Thomas W. Kensler, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center
2:25 A-6 Multi-mineral Chemoprevention in the Colon: Organoid Culture to Compare Multi-mineral Intervention with Calcium Alone
James Varani, University of Michigan Medical School
2:50 Discussion

 

Chemoprevention involves the abrogation or delay in the onset of cancer using synthetic therapeutics, healthy diets, and diet- or supplemental-based natural products. Three strategies include prevent cancer from beginning, prevent precancerous cells evolving into malignant cells, and prevent cancer from redeveloping in cancer survivors. Compounds that block the initiation or promotional stages of cancer are generally termed as blocking agents or suppressing agents, respectively. Chemopreventive agents would ideally be effective without significant adverse side effects, and are preferably affordable and readily available. In vitro bioassays have become invaluable in identifying compounds, often plant and fungal based, with chemopreventive properties. In this symposium we have three speakers. Dr. Kensler, Fred Hutchinson, is exploring the use of broccoli derived compounds that induces the Keap1-Nrf2 signaling pathway for preclinical cancer chemopreventive models. Dr. James Varani, University of Michigan, is using human colon organoids to screen a wide array of natural products for chemopreventive activity, and Dr. Brad Upham, Michigan State University, is using gap junctional intercellular communication bioassays in stem cell models to screen a wide array of natural products to prevent or reverse the effects of environmental carcinogens or oncogenes.

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1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

PLANT CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

GRANBY SALONS ABC

Plant Biotechnology Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition

Moderator: Ahmad Omar, University of Florida

Panel of Plant Biotechnology Experts Evaluating the Contestants:  Prakash Kumar, National University of Singapore, Raj Deepika Chauhan, Pairwise, Lori Marcum, Corteva Agriscience, and Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, CTC Genomics

1:30 P-1000 Production of More Acceptable Insect-resistant GM Crops for Food Consumption
H. Abdullah Ahmed Ahmed, Ankara University, S.- F. Özcan, and S. Özcan
1:50 P-1001 Targeted Multi-allelic Epigenetic Editing of Highly Polyploid Sugarcane
Isidre Hooghvorst, University of Florida-IFAS, and Fredy Altpeter
2:10 P-1002 Efficient Protein Tagging and Cis-regulatory Element Engineering via Precise and Directional Targeted Insertion in Plants
Jitesh Kumar, University of Minnesota, Si Nian Char, Trevor Weiss, Bing Yang, and Feng Zhang
2:30 P-1003 Highly Efficient Cas12a Variants for Plant Genome Editing
Gen Li, University of Maryland, College Park, Yingxiao Zhang, Liyang Zhang, Christopher Vakulskas, and Yiping Qi

The Plant Biotechnology Section is pleased to announce the 2023 Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition. Post-Doctoral Competition finalists were selected based on the quality of their abstracts. A panel of judges will evaluate the presentations at the meeting. Criteria for the evaluation include experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, appearance and ability of the post-doctoral candidate to present it. Winners will be presented with a certificate and a cash award at the meeting.

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3:10 PM - 5:30 PM

KEYNOTE SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Opening Ceremony and Keynote Symposium*

Bioengineering: Realizing the Promise of Cell Signaling Control in Health and Disease

Keynote Speaker:
Princess I. Imoukhuede, Hunter and Dorothy Simpson Endowed Chair and Professor in Bioengineering at University of Washington

3:10 Welcome and Opening Remarks:
Hong Luo, Clemson University
Addy Alt-Holland, President, Society for In Vitro Biology
3:20 TRIBUTE TO MARIETTA WHEATON SAUNDERS, SIVB MANAGING DIRECTOR
(Born September 14, 1953 – Died February 27, 2023)
Barbara B. Doonan, Treasurer
, Society for In Vitro Biology
3:30 KS-1

ROBERT H. LAWRENCE, JR. KEYNOTE SYMPOSIUM

Introduction (M. K. Dame and J. Hoeger)
Bioengineering: Realizing the Promise of Cell Signaling Control in Health and Disease
Princess I. Imoukhuede, PhD, Professor and Chair of UW Bioengineering, University of Washington

4:15 Questions and Answers
4:25 2023 SOCIETY FOR IN VITRO BIOLOGY AWARDS CEREMONY
Addy Alt-Holland, President, Society for In Vitro Biology
4:30

Acknowledgement of the 2023 Distinguished, Fellow, and Early Career Award Recipients: (Awards to be presented at Section Meetings)
Distinguished Scientist: Terry L. Riss, Promega Corporation
Fellow: Pierluigi Barone, Corteva Agriscience
Early Career: Kristina Martinez-Guryn, Midwestern University

Acknowledgement of the 2023 President’s Award Recipients: (Awards will be available at the conclusion of the Opening Ceremony)
Christopher A. Bagley, Inari Agriculture

Pierluigi Barone, Corteva Agriscience
Anissa Belfetmi-Stone, Harvard Medical University
Michael K. Dame, University of Michigan Medical School
Sarbesh Das Dangol, Tribhuvan University
Vivian R. Dayeh, University of Waterloo
Michael J. Fay, Midwestern University
Muneeb Hassan Hashmi, Nigde Omer Halidemir University
Jessica L. Rupp, Kansas State University
Brad L. Upham, Michigan State University
Joyce M. Van Eck, The Boyce Thompson Institute

4:35 2023 Distinguished Service Award Presentations
(Awards to be presented by Addy Alt-Holland):
Raj Deepika Chauhan, Pairwise
Barbara B. Doonan
, New York Medical College
Joy A. Francis
, New Beginnings Management, Inc.
Wayne A. Parrott, University of Georgia
Michele G. Schultz
, New Beginnings Management, Inc.
Margaret M. Young, Elizabeth City State University
4:45 2023 Lifetime Achievement Award Presentations
(Introduction by Peggy G. Lemaux and Todd J. Jones; Acknowledgement by Dr. Gordon-Kamm to follow)
William Gordon-Kamm, Corteva Agriscience
5:00 (Introduction by Sandra L. Schneider, Acknowledgement by Dr. Harbell to follow)
John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting LLC
5:15 (Introduction by Allan R. Wenck; Acknowledgement by Dr. Shillito to follow)
Raymond D. Shillito, Shillito and Associates
5:30 Adjourn
Group photo with the Lifetime Achievement Awardees, Dr. Gordon-Kamm, Dr. Harbell and Dr. Shillito, and student attendees

Abstract:
Dysregulated vascularization is a common feature of various diseases such as cancers, obesity, atherosclerosis, and others. Despite the recognition of this phenomenon, we have not yet fulfilled the potential of controlling vascularization to enhance human health. Bioengineering, as a discipline, provides two important benefits to help achieve this goal: 1) precise tools and techniques that can quantitatively evaluate tissue and vascular microenvironments, and 2) systems-based methods that integrate data and provide predictive insights. These approaches offer innovative platforms for drug discovery and clinical translation. In this presentation, we will discuss the progress of our research team in measuring and controlling vascular signals. Additionally, we will demonstrate how applying systems biology approaches can improve labor and delivery outcomes in women’s health.

About Dr. Imoukhuede
Princess Imoukhuede is the Hunter and Dorothy Simpson Endowed Chair and Professor in Bioengineering at University of Washington and a leader in systems biology research, engineering education, and academic diversity initiatives. She was an associate professor of Biomedical Engineering at Washington University (WU) in St. Louis, where she served as the Director of Diversity Initiatives for the McKelvey School of Engineering. Before joining WU, she was recognized with a Distinguished Promotion Award to Associate Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. She earned her SB in Chemical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and pursued graduate study in Bioengineering at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) where she was the first Black woman awarded a Bioengineering PhD and was only the second Black woman to earn a PhD from Caltech’s Division of Engineering and Applied Science. She completed her Postdoctoral Fellowship in Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins where she earned the prestigious United Negro College Fund/Merck Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. Her collaborative research efforts are impactful and productive with 170 conference proceedings and peer reviewed manuscripts, over 70 invited lectures, 1 patent, and 2 recently filed provisional patents. She has earned numerous awards, including the 2017 NSF CAREER Award, 2018 IMSA Distinguished Leadership Award, 2018 Young Innovator in Nanobiotechnology, 2019 AIChE Journal Futures Series, and 2020 University of Pittsburgh Graduate Women in Engineering Network High Impact Innovation and Inspiration Award. She is a Fellow of both the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the Biomedical Engineering Society, and in 2020, she was named one of the 1,000 “inspiring Black scientists” by Cell Mentor. Her lab pioneers both quantitative biological measurements and computational biological models to delineate signal transduction directing vascular signaling and analyzing oxytocin receptor variants with translational implications to cancers and cardiovascular diseases and women’s health.

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5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Main Salons ABCD

2023 In Vitro Biology Meeting Opening Reception
Salad greens donated courtesy of

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6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Main Salons ABCD

Poster Session
Odd Poster Authors will present

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7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Hands-on CRISPR Workshop Using Gene Editing State-of-the-Art Tool Kits*

Conveners: Jasmyn M. Hoeger, University of Iowa, and Christina Yevtushenko, McGill University

7:30 Introduction (J. M. Hoeger and C. Yevtushenko)
7:35 E-5 Hands-on CRISPR Workshop Using Gene Editing State-of-the-art Tool Kits
Eudald Illa-Berenguer, University of Georgia, and Grant Poole, Thermo Fisher Scientific
8:30 Hands-On Experience and Exercises
9:25 Closing Remarks

CRISPR is a powerful genome editing technology that enables researchers to easily modify gene function and alter DNA sequences. This workshop will focus on introducing researchers to the principles behind CRISPR and the key differences between Plant and Animal CRISPR technology. Additionally, it will provide a chance to explore CRISPR through hands-on usage of gene editing tool kits from scientific companies. The workshop is aimed at teaching the key differences between Plant and Animal CRISPR, the computational analysis of the raw data, and proper usage of gene editing tools. There is no pre-requisite programming experience necessary. Resources will be made available to researchers prior to the workshop to introduce them to CRISPR. Gene editing tools will be available for students through participating exhibitors and Edvotek. Edvotek was the first company to focus on translating cutting-edge biotechnology for the teaching classroom. They work with educators globally to demystify science and foster the next generation of scientists through hands-on, active learning activities. For the best experience, students are required to familiarize themselves with CRISPR, prepare questions, and come ready to learn! 

Monday, June 12

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7:00 AM - 6:00 PM

4TH FLOOR REGISTRATION

Registration

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7:00 AM - 8:00 AM

Fusion

In Vitro – Animal Editorial Board Meeting

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7:00 AM - 8:00 AM

Granby ABC

Plant Biotechnology Program Planning Committee Meeting
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8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

PLENARY SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Michael E. Horn Emerging Technologies Symposium: Research to Market – In Vitro Biology Product Development*

Conveners: Allan R. Wenck, Syngenta Crop Protection, Raj Deepika Chauhan, Pairwise, Muneeb Hassan Hashmi, Nigde Omer Halidemir University, Kenneth Kandaras, International Foundation for Ethical Research, and John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting

8:00 Announcement of the Michael Horn Emerging Technologies Symposium (A. Alt-Holland)
8:05 Introduction (A. R. Wenck, R.D. Chauhan, M. H. Hashmi, K. Kandaras, J. W. Harbell)
8:10 PS-4 Commercialization of a Peripheral Nerve-on-a-Chip: “Trials and Triumphs”
Michael J. Moore, Tulane University and AxioSim, Inc.
8:45 PS-5 Better Salads for the Produce Aisle: The Story of Conscious™ Greens Development from Proof-of-Concept to the Marketplace
Aaron Hummel
, Pairwise
9:20 PS-6 Disrupting Agriculture While Not Disrupting Global Food Chains
Raymond D. Shillito, Shillito & Associates
9:55 Discussion



​This plenary – dedicated to the memory of Michael Horn – will focus on “disruptive” in vitro work.  Speakers will address not only how the in vitro biology on a technical basis is created, but also how an idea is enabled through in vitro biology.  How this is further developed into such disruptive offers.  Our first speaker will be giving us an understanding on how in vitro technology can expand beyond a single cell to give relevant results that disrupt the industry of animal models and testing.  Moving toward true “organs/organisms on a chip”.  Our second speaker will present a concept to product perspective utilizing novel gene editing technology: from concept, to in vitro enabling technology, to product.  Our last speaker will focus on enabling disruptive in vitro technology to enter the market without making an “unintended” disruptive impact.  Taking an idea to market, especially when that involves steps of in vitro biology for introduction of new traits.  Here, the concern is assuring that the “disruption” is intended and focused especially when global trade is concerned, one needs to assure that proper stewardship considerations are in place.  We encourage all disrupters to be there and to be ready to engage in active Q&A

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10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Main Salons ABCD

Coffee Break

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10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Fusion

Nominating Committee Meeting
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10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

1783

Awards Committee Meeting

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

PAUL D. FRAIM

Fish Cell Culture

Conveners: Vivian R. Dayeh, University of Waterloo, and Georgina Dowd, Plant and Food Research New Zealand

10:30 Introduction (V. R. Dayeh)
10:35 A-7 Delineating Ante Factum and Post Factum Properties of Animal Cell Lines and Using Them to Organize Fish Cell Lines into Invitromes
Niels Bols, University of Waterloo
10:55 A-8 Cellular Aquaculture as an Alternative Food Production System
Michael Saad, Tufts University
11:15 A-9 Cell Lines Aiding Fish Virus Research
Suja Aarattuthodi, Mississippi State University
11:35 A-10 The Atlantic Salmon Gill Epithelial Cell Line ASG-10 as Tool for In Vitro Gill Research
Anita Solhaug
, Norwegian Veterinary Institute
11:55 A-11 Fish Cell Culture: Supporting the Health of Our Fish and Creating New Technologies for Seafood Production
Georgina Dowd, The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited


 

​Would you be interested in fishing in a flask? Since the establishment of RTG-2 in 1962, a variety of fish cell lines have been developed from a variety of species. Fish cell cultures are versatile and easy to use, making them ideal for a wide range of research applications. Speakers in this session will highlight the diverse uses of fish cell culture including fundamental invitrome organization, cell line development, applied virology and toxicology studies, and cellular agriculture.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Innovative Approaches for Plant Gene & Editing Delivery*

Conveners: Matthew R. Willmann, Pairwise, and Raj Deepika Chauhan, Pairwise

10:30 Introduction (M. R. Willmann and R. D. Chauhan)
10:35 P-15 Combining Multi-Omics Integration and Genome Editing in Forest Trees for Sustainable Fiber and Bioenergy Production
Jack Wang
, North Carolina State University
11:00 P-16 Viral Approaches for Overcoming Reagent Delivery Bottlenecks in Plant Genome Editing
Zhenghe Li,
Zhejiang University
11:25 P-17 Transgene-free CRISPR-edited Plants through Grafting by RNA Translocation
Frank Machin, The University of Edinburgh
11:50 P-18 Nanoclay Particles for Active Uptake and Systemic Delivery of Genes into Intact Plants
Bernard Carroll, The University of Queensland
12:15 Discussion


Making transgenic and gene-edited plants typically involves delivery of DNA to cells using one of three standard methods—Agrobacterium, particle bombardment, or protoplast permeabilization—followed by selection and regeneration of stable transgenics in tissue culture to yield full plants with shoots and roots. As good as these approaches can be, researchers continue to work to develop alternative DNA-delivery methods to improve transformation efficiencies, eliminate or reduce the need for tissue culture, and/or allow for genotype-independent transformation. The advent of gene editing has also created a need for novel delivery methods, particularly for clonally propagated plants, that enable transgene-free editing. In this session, the invited speakers will share their experiences developing innovative approaches for gene and editing tool delivery to plant cells. The topics covered include DNA-free delivery of CRISPR editing tools to protoplasts using ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs), RNA-based delivery of Cas and gRNAs using plant RNA viruses, delivery of editing reagents using mobile RNAs and grafting, and DNA delivery using nanoclay particles.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

PLANT CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

GRANBY SALONS DE

Plant Biotechnology Student Oral Presentation Competition

Moderator: Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, CTC Genomics

Panel of Plant Biotechnology Experts Evaluating the Contestants:  Pamela Vogel, Pairwise, Lorena Moeller, Bayer Cropscience, Larissa Pereira Silva, North Carolina State University, and Bin Tian, Syngenta

10:30 P-1004 Multiplexed CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Gene Editing in Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) for Improved Turf Quality
Qasim Ali, University of Florida, David May, and Fredy Altpeter
10:50 P-1005 MiR169-NF-Y Module Associates with Creeping Bentgrass Biomass Production and Stress Response
Xiaotong Chen, Clemson University, Jason Yeung, Andrew Fiorentino, Qian Hu, Morgan Kuess, and Hong Luo
11:10 P-1006 Production of Isowighteone in Hairy Root Cultures of Pigeon Pea (Cajanus cajan) Using an Optimized Elicitation Procedure
Gaurav Gajurel, Arkansas Biosciences Institute and Arkansas State University, Luis Nopo-Olazabal, Emily Hendrix, and Fabricio Medina-Bolivar
11:30 P-1007 Generation of Auxotrophic Agrobacterium Strains Using a CRISPR-mediated Base-editor
Vincent Joseph Pennetti, University of Georgia, Eudald Illa-Berenguer, and Wayne Allen Parrott
11:50 P-1008 Copper Sulphate Foliar Applications and Soil Amendments Alters Pathogens Found on Cannabis sativa
G. I. Robinson, University of Lethbridge, A. Eriksson, H. Farahmand, Y. Ilnytskyy, M. Gerasymchuk, and I. Kovalchuk
12:10 P-1009 Author is unable to present

The Plant Biotechnology Section is pleased to announce the 2023 Plant Biotechnology Student Oral Presentation Competition. Competition finalists were selected based on the quality of the abstracts. The abstract should address the following: Background, Objectives, Methods, Results, Discussion and Conclusions. Where appropriate, the methods section should include a description of how reproducible results were ensured. A panel of judges will evaluate the presentations at the meeting. Criteria for the evaluation include experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, appearance and ability of the student to present it. Winners will be presented with a certificate and a cash award at the meeting. 

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12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Fusion

SIVB/IAPB/Springer Business Meeting

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12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Main Salons ABCD

Refreshment Break
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12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Granby Salons ABC

Student Affairs Business Meeting Luncheon
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1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Plant Interactive Poster Session

Main Salons ABCD

Biotechnology for Sustainable Agriculture

Moderator: Eudald Illa-Berenguer, University of Georgia

P-2000 Pyramiding microRNAs for Transgene Containment and Broad Plant Abiotic Stress Resistance
Zhaohui Chen, Clemson University, Hong Luo, Xiaotong Chen, and Qian Hu
P-2001 Overexpression of Flowering Locus D (FLD) in Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea) Enhances Tolerance to Alternaria brassicae and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum
Anjana Rustagi, Gargi College – University of Delhi, Shashi Shekhar, Ruby Panwar, Deepak Kumar,  and Ashis K. Nandi
P-2002 Understanding the Regulation of Fruit Abscission in Physalis grisea
Elise Tomaszewski, Cornell University, and Joyce Van Eck
P-2003 Transformation of American Chestnut Founder Lines with the Wheat Oxalate Oxidase Gene (oxo) for Blight Tolerance
Skye E. Remko, Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics at the University of Georgia, Scott A. Merkle, Andrew Tull, and Heather Gladfelter
P-2004 Plant Cells-produced Anti-TNFα Biomolecules for Oral Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Paula Perez Sanchez, Arkansas State University, Jianfeng Xu, and Jonathan Trejo Martinez
P-2005 Bladderwort Short Sequences Work as Insulators in Nicotiana Plants
Eudald Illa-Berenguer, University of Georgia, Jubilee Park, Lynsey Kovar, Peter LaFayette, Jason Wallace, Wayne Parrott
}

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

ANIMAL CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

PAUL D. FRAIM

IVACS Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition

Moderator: Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University and Kolla Kristjansdottir, Midwestern University

Panel of In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences Experts Evaluating the Contestants: Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University, Kolla Kristjansdottir, Midwestern University, John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting, LLC, Barbara Doonan, New York Medical College, Debora Esposito, North Carolina State University, Michael J. Fay, Midwestern University, Brad L. Upham, Michigan State University, Michael Dame, University of Michigan, Mae Ciancio, Midwestern University, Anissa Belfetmi-Stone, Harvard University, and Zoe Xiaofang Zhu, Tufts University

1:30 A-1000 Developing Cell Lines from Young and Adult Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)
Mari Austad Brandt, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Ania M. Bula, R. Scott Sheffield, Guro K. Sandvik, and Lucy E.J. Lee
1:50 A-1001 Encapsulation of Long dsRNA in Extracellular Vesicles, SARS-CoV2 Virus-like Particles, and Liposomes for the Stimulation of Antiviral RNA Interference Against Human Coronaviruses
D. E. Daniels, Wilfrid Laurier University, S. J. Oberhoffner, S. M. S. Carr, and S. J. DeWitte-Orr
2:10 A-1002 Identification of Stratifin as a Potential Protein Biomarker Indicative of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression
S. Rizvi, Midwestern University, and H. Arnouk

This competition encourages the exchange of scientific information between the presenters, attendees and judges. Additionally, it provides an invaluable opportunity for students and post-docs to practice and improve their presentation delivery and public speaking skills. The top three finalists were selected for this competition based on the quality of their abstracts, as well as the merit of their research and scientific findings. The oral presentations will be presented in-person at the meeting and a panel of expert judges will select the top presentation. Evaluation criteria will include experimental design, data analysis, proper interpretation of the results, originality of the study, technical difficulty, professionalism, the ability of the finalist to explain the research and answer questions, and importantly, adherence to the allocated time for the presentation. The Student and Post-Doctoral Oral Presentation Competition session serves to recognize and reward the research and achievements of outstanding students and post-docs. The three finalists will be presented with a certificate and a cash award during the 2023 SIVB Annual Meeting.

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1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Plant Interactive Poster Session

Main Salons ABCD

Novel Approach for Plant Transformation and Genome Editing

Moderator: Albert P. Kausch, University of Rhode Island

P-2012 Developing In Vitro Culture Tools for Mandarin and Sweet Cherry In Vivo Editing
Ignacia Fuentes, Meristem, María José Montañola, Julia Rubio, V. Borjas, C. Nuñez, C. Valenzuela, Y. Muñoz, M. Acuña, G. Aguilar, M. Cona and B. Pollak
P-2013 Developmental Sequence of Somatic Embryogenesis Initiated by Differential Expression of Baby boom and Wuschel2  in Sorghum bicolor L.
Albert P. Kausch, University of Rhode Island, and Mike Tilelli
P-2014 Transient and Stable Transformation of the Model Hornwort Anthoceros agrestis via Biolistics
Declan Lafferty, Boyce Thompson Institute, Andika Gunadi, Joyce Van Eck, and Fay-Wei Li
P-2015 A Novel Templated Editing System for Precise Sequence Replacement Via Reverse Transcriptase and Diverse CRISPR-Cas Systems
Qingchun Shi, Pairwise, Bill Y. Kim, Elizabeth B. Pierce, Michael Brown, Brenda A. Peterson, Derek Sanford, Justin Fear, David Nicholl, Ellyce San Pedro, Grace M. Reynolds, Joanne E. Hunt, David G. Schwark, Sathya Jali, Nathaniel Graham, Zoe Cesarz, Tracey A. Lincoln Chapman, Joseph M. Watts, and Aaron W. Hummel
P-2016 Successful Indirect Regeneration of Octoploid Strawberry Varieties through In Vitro Leaf Tissue Culture
Cheol-Min Yoo, University of Florida, and Seonghee Lee
P-2017 Epigenetic Signatures Defining Gene Editing Efficiency in Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)
Andriy Bilichak, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Natalia Bykova, Louie Lopos, Susan Brown, and Kerry Ward
}

2:30 PM -3:30 PM

Main Salons ABCD

Poster Session
Even Poster Authors will present

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3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

GRANBY SALONS DE

Artificial (Synthetic) Seeds

Convener: Lorena Moeller, Bayer Cropscience, and Todd J. Jones, Corteva Agriscience

3:30 Introduction (L. Moeller and T. J. Jones)
3:35 P-19 Developing North American Hardwood Forest Tree Somatic Embryos as Operational Propagules: Bioreactors, Synchronization, Synthetic Seeds and Ex Vitro Conversion
Scott Merkle, University of Georgia
4:00 P-20 A Novel Concept in Synthetic Seed Design and Scale-up
Jeff Hartle
4:25 P-21 TBD
4:50 Discussion

The use of artificial (or synthetic) seeds as a propagation technique relies on the successful propagation, conservation, encapsulation and delivery of plant cells, tissues, or organs in an artificial matrix. Synthetic seeds develop into whole plants in the proper in vitro or ex vitro environment, allowing sowing practices to be like conventional seeds, or further customized and optimized through the encapsulation components. Originally, synthetic seeds were produced mostly from somatic embryos, but the application has broadened to include shoot buds, cell aggregates, propagules, protocorms, meristems, etc. The synthetic seed technology has important high value applications in the fields of conservation, clonal propagation, mass production, automation, and custom-optimized seed prescription. This session will explore application of artificial seeds across diverse species and the methods to optimize artificial seed production at scale.

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3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

JOINT SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Biotechnology for Sustainability*

Conveners: Sukhpreet Sandhu, HM Clause, and Vivian R. Dayeh, University of Waterloo

3:30 Introduction (S. Sandhu and V. R. Dayeh)
3:35 J-1 Harnessing the Power of Plant Synthetic Biology to Combat Climate Change
Yumin Tao, Living Carbon
4:00 J-2 Targeted Metabolic Engineering of Quillaja saponaria for High Valued Saponins Production
Eli Khayat, Botanical Solutions Inc.
4:25 J-3 Skeletal Muscle Tissue Engineering for Organ-on-a-Chip and Cultivated Meat Applications
Samad Ahadian, NouBio Inc.
4:50 Discussion

It is of no surprise that historical and current anthropogenic activities are not sustainable for the future of our planet. The power of both plant and animal in vitro technologies is key to improving sustainability through biotechnology. In this session, our speakers will showcase the ability to enhance carbon dioxide capture in plants that help to balance the planet’s carbon cycle, the use of plant cell culture to extract naturally derived compounds without conventional agricultural processes, and methods to produce cultivated meat in a serum-free environment that reduces the need for animal products.

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3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

EDUCATION CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

GRANBY SALONS ABC

Student Oral Presentation Session

Conveners: Jasmyn M. Hoeger, University of Iowa, and Christina Yevtushenko, McGill University

3:30 Introduction (J. M. Hoeger and C. Yevtushenko)
3:35 A-2006 Histamine 2 Receptor Influence on Chemokine Production in Macrophages is STAT6-independent
Peter Alfano, Midwestern University, Julie Swartzendruber, Rosalinda Del Toro, and Ryan Incrocci
3:55 A-2012 A New Assay to Distinguish Between the Breast Cancer MCF7 and MCF7/ADR-resistant Cells Based on Exosomal RNA
Mohammed Abdelaziz, The American University in Cairo, Ehab El Sawy, and Anwar Abdelnaser
4:15 P-2046 Managing Sugarcane Aphid in Sorghum and Armillaria Species in Peach using Nucleic Acid Molecules
Prasanna Valavanur Shekar, Clemson University, Sachin Rustgi, and Katherine A. Wakeley
4:35 TBD
4:55 Discussion

The Society for In Vitro Biology (SIVB) takes pride in showcasing some of the most innovative research topics in both plant and animal sciences. Our mission for the non-competitive oral presentations are to provide a platform for student researchers to achieve recognition and share their research work with their peers as well as academic and industry professionals, who can take their projects to the next level without the pressure of competing. This section is designated for those who are looking to gain experience in presenting scientific information, as well as for those who are developing effective scientific presentation skills.

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5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

ANIMAL CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

PAUL D. FRAIM

IVACS Contributed Paper Session

Moderator: Zoe Zhu, Tufts University

5:00 A-1003 Ihe Effects of Thermal Stress on the Cellular Responses of Common and Phylogenetically Diverse Florida Reef Sponges
M. Conkling, Florida Atlantic University, Z. Xie, W. Liu, T. Moore, T. Hindle, and S. A. Pomponi
5:15 A-1004

Enhanced Delivery of Plasmid DNA Using Pulsed Electric Fields in Combination with Moderate Heat
Richard Heller, University of South Florida, Jody Synowiec, Samantha Mannarino, Julie Singh, Guilan Shi, Alex Otten, and Mark Jaroszeski

5:30 A-1005 Single-cell Sequencing Reveals Altered Immune Response and a New Epithelia Subtype in APDC Deficiency Mice with Periodontitis
Zoe Zhu, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Elissa K. Zboinski, and Jake Chen
5:45 A-1006 Tumorigenic Potential of Triclosan, a Household Antimicrobial Ingredient, and Chemoprevention by Resveratrol
Brad L. Upham, Michigan State University, Anna A. Heath, Jamie E. Liebold, Anthony B. Ketner, Bailey DelCamp, and Lizbeth Lockwood
}

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

PLANT CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

GRANBY SALONS ABC

Plant Biotechnology Contributed Paper Session

Moderator: Nagesh Sardesai, Corteva Agriscience

5:00 P-1011 PPR10 RNA Binding-Protein for Regulated Protein Expression in Tobacco Seed Plastids
Pal Maliga, Rutgers University, Alyssa Leung, Kerry Lutz, and Malihe Mirzae
5:15 P-1012 Use of a Ternary Vectors and GRF-GIF Chimeras to Improve Transformation Efficiency of the Maize Inbred B104
L. Pauwels, Ghent University, G. Coussens, S. Aesaert, J. Debernardi, J. Haeghebaert,  L. Impens, and W. Vandeputte
5:30 P-1013 In Vitro Culture of Agricultural Crops in Nepal
S. D. Dangol, Tribhuvan University, and Nepal Plant Disease and Agro Associates, H. K. Manandhar, S. Rajbahak, and B. Shrestha
5:45 P-1014 Blurring Disciplinary Boundaries to Offer Healthier, Safer Life to Individuals Through Nutritionally Enhanced, Safe Food or Better Diagnostics
Sachin Rustgi, Clemson University, Zachary Jones, Hrishikesh Ingole, Tariq Alam, and Prasanna Shekar
}

5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

PLANT CONTRIBUTED PAPER SESSION

GRANBY SALONS DE

Towards a Robust Genome Editing Platform Contributed Paper Session

Moderator: Pamela Vogel, Pairwise

5:00 P-1015 Establishment of Robust and Efficient Plant Transformation Pipeline to Develop Nutrient Dense Leafy Greens Through Gene Editing
R. D. Chauhan, Pairwise, K. Davis, and A. Hummel
5:15 P-1016 The Living DEEP- Direct Epicotyl Editing Platform-A Tissue Culture Free Approach for Direct Genome Editing in Plants
A. P. Kausch, University of Rhode Island
5:30 P-1017 Developmental Regulator (DR)-enabled Soybean Transformatio
V. Raman, University of Minnesota, G. Patil, and F. Zhang
5:45 P-1018 Bypassing Tissue Culture: RNA Virus Induced Gene Editing in Sorghum
Can Baysal, University of Minnesota, Jon P. Cody, and Daniel F. Voytas
}

6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Paul D. Fraim

In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences Business Meeting
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6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Granby ABC

Plant Biotechnology Section Business Meeting
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7:30 PM - 10:00 PM

Exchange Foyer and Continuous Break Area

Joint Sections’ Social

Tuesday, June 13

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7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

4TH FLOOR REGISTRATION

Registration

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7:00 AM - 8:00 AM

Fusion

In Vitro – Plant Editorial Board Meeting

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7:00 AM - 8:00 AM

1783

Membership Committee Meeting

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8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

PLENARY SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Microbiome – Basic Science to Application*

Conveners: Bin Tian, Syngenta Crop Protection, Christina Yevtushenko, McGill University, Kristina Martinez-Guryn, Midwestern University, and Mae Ciancio, Midwestern University

8:00 Introduction (K. Martinez-Guryn, B. Tian, and C. Yevtushenko)
8:05 PS-7 Microbiomes and Antimicrobial Resistance – a “One Health” Perspective
Tim A. McAllister, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
8:40 PS-8 The Second Century of Phytobiome Research
Carolee T. Bull, Penn State University
9:15 PS-9 The Host-Microbiome Interactome: Discovery Inferred from Systems Biology
Tor Savidge, Baylor College of Medicine
9:50 Discussion

Microorganisms are integral members of environmental and organismal ecosystems that are capable of mediating interconnectedness between soil, plants, livestock, and humans with the potential to influence health.  The goal of this plenary session “Microbiomes at the Intersection of One Health” is to offer a comprehensive overview of a wide range of microbes or microbiomes that mediate such links and that significantly impact plant, animal, and human health. These interactions will be illustrated through three presentations given by leaders in the fields of environmental microbiology and plant pathology, rumen microbiology and antibiotic resistance and finally human pathogen infection. Together, these presentations are expected to highlight how distinct microbiomes are inter-related and contribute health outcomes amongst plants, animals and humans.

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10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Main Salons ABCD

Coffee Break

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10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

1783

Constitutions and Bylaws Committee Meeting
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10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Fusion

Education Committee Meeting

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10:30 AM

Main Salons ABCD

Closing of the Mermaid City Silent Auction
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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Advances in Biotechnology and Their Applications in Invertebrate Cell Culture*

Conveners: Shirley A. Pomponi, Florida Atlantic University, and Cynthia L. Goodman, CryoCrate, LLC

10:30 Introduction (C. L. Goodman)
10:35 A-12 In Vitro Production of Sponge-derived Compounds with Human Health Applications: New Challenges
Shirley A. Pomponi
, Florida Atlantic University
11:00 A-13 Harnessing Stress-induced Evolution for Cell Immortalization in a Colonial Tunicate
Alison M. Gardell, University of Washington
11:25 A-14 Insect Cell Lines Functional Genomics
Subba R. Palli, University of Kentucky
11:50 A-15 Toward Insect Gut Epithelia-on-a-Chip: 3D In Vitro Systems for Modeling the Invertebrate Gut Epithelium
Eleana Manousiouthakis
, University of Florida
12:15 Discussion

Invertebrate cell cultures serve as invaluable tools in pharmaceutical, environmental and agricultural research programs, including in the development of highly beneficial products.  Marine invertebrate cell cultures are intimately involved in the discovery and isolation of unique medical components, as well as provide insights into ecological disturbances.  Insect cell cultures play an effective role in insecticide discovery programs in both screening assays and mode of action studies. In all cases, in vitro methodologies are constantly being upgraded to enhance the performance of these cell culture-based assays.  Our symposium will highlight some of the state-of-the-art methodologies involved in these advances, including 3D cell culture, single cell sequencing and other related molecular techniques. In the marine biology arena, one speaker will highlight how advances in sponge cell biotechnology are leading to the development of novel drugs.  Another presenter will outline the harnessing of invertebrate cells in ecotoxicity studies to determine the impact of specific pollutants on the marine ecosystem.  For the agricultural focus, our speakers will discuss the use of primary cultures from insect digestive tissues as model systems for both targeting insecticides as well understanding basic invertebrate biology.  We will follow up the presentations with a panel discussion to better integrate and synthesize the ideas brought forward by our speakers, as well as to broaden the scope of application and summarize key points.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

GRANBY SALONS ABC

Plant Metabolomics and Metabolic Engineering

Convener: Qingchun Shi, Pairwise

10:30 Introduction (Q. Shi)
10:35 P-22

Metabolic Engineering for Hyper-accumulation of Lipids in Bioenergy and Forage Grasses

Fredy Altpeter, University of Florida

11:10 P-23 TBD
Nishanth Tharayil, Clemson University
11:45 P-24 Alkaloid Chemistry and Biology of Mitragyna speciosa, a Pharmaceutically Important Tree Species with a Potential to Treat Pain and Opioid Withdrawal
Swathi Nadakuduti, University of Florida
12:20 Discussion

Metabolomics is a great systemic approach to understand plant indigenous chemical status as well as the interaction with its environment. Being natural factories of chemical compounds, plants possess invaluable metabolism creating chemicals for human food, biofuel, and pharmaceutical uses. Dissection of these metabolic pathways not only help us to understand how plants became specialized in compound production, but sheds light on ways for scientists to engineer metabolic pathways to boost or enable the beneficial chemical production in plants. In response to environmental cues, plants employ an arsenal of compounds to help them adapt to biotic and abiotic stresses, interact with other organisms, and balance resources between development and defenses. This gains us insight on why plants are resilient to different environments and what contributes to a harmonious ecosystem allowing more sustainable agricultural production. As precise genome engineering tools such as CRISPR-Cas being readily accessible and versatile, the expansion of metabolic engineering research results in more productive plants for chemical and more resilient species for the changing environment. In return, efficient genome engineering requires to solve several bottlenecks such as plant regeneration and transformation steps of recalcitrant species, and plant metabolomics could potentially provide novel solutions.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

GRANBY SALONS DE

Unlocking Efficiencies for Production Laboratories (Media Prep & Workplace Design, Ergonomics, Best Practices)

Conveners: Micah E. Stevens, Sierra Gold Nurseries, and Peizhen Yang, Bayer Cropscience

10:30 Introduction (M. E. Stevens and P. Yang)
10:35 P-25 Unlocking Efficiencies for Production Laboratories (Media Prep & Workplace Design, Ergonomics, Best Practices)
Bailey Van Bockern, Sierra Gold Nurseries
11:00 P-26 A Method to Evaluate and Communicate Bottlenecks in Large Scale Plant Production Research
Audrey Vaughn, Bayer Crop Science
11:25 P-27 High-volume Isolation and Storage of Grain Legume and Cereal Monocot Embryo Explants for Utilization in Genome Engineering and Editing Applications
Brian Martinell, University of Wisconsin-Madison
11:50 P-28 Embrace Nature to Dramatically Improve Processes
Della Fetzer, Rebel Cultures, LLC
12:15 Discussion

 

Production tissue culture labs utilize the basic principles of micropropagation and transformation, but on a large scale to rapidly create large number plantlets with elite traits for the forestry, ornamental, and agricultural industries. The knowledge and protocols developed at the research level don’t always translate to large scale production and often must be optimized accordingly. Considering the complexity of simultaneously handling multiple genotypes/traits, tight production schedule, and repetitive nature of operation, special care is required to ensure smooth and successful production to fulfill customer orders. In this session, we will hear from tissue culture experts in both academia and industry on approaches to ensure the success of a production lab, including production scheduling, protocol optimization, process automation, data storage and inventory tracking.

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12:30 PM

4TH FLOOR REGISTRATION

Announcement of the Mermaid City Silent Auction Winners
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12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Fusion

2024 Program Planning and Development Committee Meeting
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1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

PLANT INTERACTIVE POSTER SESSION

MAIN SALONS ABCD

Improving Plant Genetic Transformation

Moderator: Omar Zayed, University of California Riverside

P-2019

Optimization of Sorghum Leaf Whorl Transformation and Regeneration
Megan Kelly, University of Florida, and Wilfred Vermerris

P-2020 Overexpression of ZmWOX2A Enhances Somatic Embryogenesis and Transformation Efficiency in Maize (Zea mays L.) and Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.)
Jonathan M. Matheka, Wisconsin Crop Innovation Center, Frank McFarland, Nathaniel Schleif, Ray Collier, Nathalie Walter, William Petersen, David Animasaun, Brian Martinell, and Heidi Kaeppler
P-2021 Investigating the Molecular Mechanism Behind In Vitro Fruiting in Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom Mutant
Claire Mauss, University of California – Riverside, Martha Orozco-Cardenas, Marcus Harland-Dunaway, Andres Narvaez, and Robert Jinkerson
P-2022 Tissue-culture-free Genetic Transformation and Gene-editing in Plants
Arjun O. Ojha-Kshetry, Texas Tech University, Gunvant Patil, Luis Herrera-Estrella, and Vikas Devkar
P-2023 Over-expression of Morphogenic Genes Enhances Plant Regeneration in Cassava (Manihot esculenta)
Rosana Segatto, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Nigel Taylor, and Gecele M. Paggi
P-2061

Exploring the Function and Significance of CrRLK1L and RALF Gene Families in Citrus under Salt Stress Conditions
Omar Zayed
, University of California – Riverside, and Danelle Seymour

 

}

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

ANIMAL INTERACTIVE POSTER SESSION

MAIN SALONS ABCD

In Vitro Animal Cell Sciences Interactive Poster Session

Moderator: Anissa Belfetmi-Stone, Harvard University

A-2000 Ultraviolet Radiation as an Effective Papillomatous Digital Dermatitis and Trichophyton verrucosum Treatment
Jasmyn M. Hoeger, University of Iowa, Cheryl Kluesner, and Gabrielle T. Hoeger
A-2001 Using Fish Epithelial Cell Lines to Study the Impact of Nitrate, Nitrite and Ammonia on Fish
Daylan Pritchard, University of the Fraser Valley, Niels C. Bols, and Lucy E. J. Lee
A-2003 A First-in-Class Biocompatible and Efficient Cryopreservation Technology for Biological and Bioartificial Tissues
Xu Han, University of Missouri and CryoCrate, and Henry White
A-2004 Long dsRNA Induced Knock Down of GLIPR1 by RNAi in SNB75 Cells
Stephanie J. DeWitte-Orr, Wilfrid Laurier University, Sarah Au, Iliana Portelli, and Maytal Soref
A-2005 Nanocarrier Delivery of Immunostimulatory DNA Molecules to Healthy Human Cells
Sarah J. Poynter, Wilfrid Laurier University, Natalie L. Aldor, Kayla Amuge, Vladimir Kitaev, Celine Meleka, and Nicholas A. Jadaa
A-2025 Characterization of TNFR2 Receptor Clustering in Health and Diseases
Anissa Belfetmi-Stone, Harvard Medical School, Philipp Aschauer, and Gerhard Wagner

 

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1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

PLANT INTERACTIVE POSTER SESSION

MAIN SALONS ABCD

Technique Development for Plant In Vitro Culture

Moderator: Khalil Jahed, Virginia Tech

P-2006 Rapid Propagation Techniques for Indoor Specialty Crop (Strawberry) Production
Austin D. Jameson, Old Dominion University, and Lisa Horth
P-2007 Rapid Shoot Regeneration and High-efficiency Transformation of Leaf Explants in Hybrid Poplar
Gary Orr, Living Carbon, Marina Kalyaeva, Kenneth Donsky, Michelle Tjahjadi, Alex Crites, Karli Rasmussen, Natalie Dick, Jacob Hoyle, and Matt Heckert
P-2008 Exploring the Cross-species Applicability of a Tissue Culture Medium Developed for Nuttall’s Scrub Oak (Quercus dumosa) for the Ex Situ Conservation of Coastal Chaparral Ecosystem Species
Joseph F. Ree, San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance
P-2009 Exploring the Relationship Between Rootstock and Frost Tolerance in Apple Trees through Soluble Sugars and Reactive Oxygen Species
Amolpreet Kaur Saini, Virginia Tech, Sherif M. Sherif, Jianyang Liu, and Md Tabibul Islam
P-2011

Agrobacterium-mediated Transformation and Plant Regeneration of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)
Suma Basak, Fort Valley State University, Terri Brearley, and Seema Dhir

 

P-2054 Production of Polyploid Mandarin Hybrids from Seeds Extracted from Selected Triploids
Ahmad A. Omar, University of Florida, Azza H. Mohamed, and Jude W. Grosser

 

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2:30 PM -3:30 PM

Main Salons ABCD

Poster Session
Odd Poster Authors will present

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3:30 PM - 4:00 PM

Main Salons ABCD

Poster Breakdown and Removal
All posters to be removed by 4:00 pm

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3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

GRANBY SALONS DE

Cannabis Biotechnology

Convener: Max Jones, University of Guelph

3:30 Introduction (M. Jones)
3:35 P-29

Cannabinoid Transport: From Gene Discovery to Biotechnology
Benjamin Rimon, Volcani Center

4:00 P-30 Heritable Genetic Engineering and Editing of Cannabis Sativa
Mike Petersen, University of Wisconsin – Madison
4:25 P-31 Enzyme Engineering to Create Novel Terminal Synthases and Hemp Plants for the Controlled Expression of Both Major and Minor Cannabinoids
Michael Mendez, Hypercann Agrogenetics
4:50 Discussion

Cannabis research has traditionally been prevented due to legal barriers and many biotechnologies that we take for granted in other crops simply do not exist for this species.  However, legalization in many states across the US and countries around the globe has spurred interest in this area and many modern technologies have now been developed despite the many challenges presented by this crop.  In this session, academic and industry leaders will present new technologies in the area of cannabis biotechnology with a focus on genetic manipulation.  These technologies include genetic transformation systems, gene silencing, and metabolic engineering.

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3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Designing In Vitro Assays That Are Predictive of In Vivo Activity: A Focus on Development of Prediction Models*

Conveners: John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting, and Addy Alt-Holland, Tufts University
Student Convener: Jasmyn M. Hoeger, University of Iowa

3:30 Introduction (J. W. Harbell, A. Alt-Holland, and J. M. Hoeger)
3:35 A-16

Prerequisites for Creating a Functional Prediction Model for a New Approach Methodology (NAM)
John W. Harbell, JHarbell Consulting

4:15 A-17 In Vitro Test Method Development: Starting with the End User in Mind
David Allen, Inotiv
4:55 Discussion

Over the past several decades, there has been a marked increase in the number and complexity of cell and tissue-based bioassays being applied to a wide range of regulatory, developmental and safety applications. Examples include the federal agencies move to adverse outcome pathways in cultured human cells, 3D human tissue constructs and human iPSC-derived cell and tissue model systems. The protocols range from simple cytotoxicity assays to more refined systems for the prediction of hazard to complex systems that incorporate exposure kinetics and endpoint-specific measures to address risk. In this context, risk is defined as the demonstrated potential for an adverse outcome from an exposure. In vitro mutagenicity assays might be seen as predictors of hazard, rather than risk, since in vivo exposure is not modeled. Tissue construct models for predicting skin or eye irritation do incorporate exposure kinetics and so hold the promise of predicting risk (i.e., degree of irritation). This symposium will focus on test methods that are designed to predict hazard or risk, highlighting test guidelines falling under the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) international program. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of quantitative predictions models that are used to translate the in vitro results into an in vivo prediction of hazard or risk. The prediction model is a key element in assay validation, and is predicated on establishing the reproducibility of the assay over time. Additionally, the test systems and assay endpoints should have mechanistic relevance in vivo. The discussion will include the importance of the prediction models developed with reference chemicals of known activity in vivo and the use of representative reference chemicals from different chemical classes and physical forms (solid/liquid) will be discussed. Presentations will address the historical drivers for the development of “modern” prediction models and real world experiences in building assay systems and resulting prediction models for regulatory applications.

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3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

GRANBY SALONS ABC

Novel Transformation Technologies

Conveners: Yurong Chen, Bayer U. S. – Crop Science, Heidi F. Kaeppler, University of Wisconsin, and M. Annie Saltarikos, Bayer U. S. – Crop Science

3:30 Introduction (Y. Chen, H. F. Kaeppler, and M. A. Saltarikos)
3:35 P-32 High-throughput Agrobacterium-mediated Transformation of Seed Embryo Explants (SEEs) from Mature Seeds of Maize through Organogenesis
Lorena Moeller, Bayer U. S. CropScience
4:00 P-33 Embryogenic Tissue Culture Response Gene Identified from Maize Inbred Line A188 Induces Regenerable Somatic Embryo Formation in Recalcitrant Maize Inbred B73
Frank McFarland, University of Wisconsin
4:25 P-34 GiFT: Genotype-independent Fast Transformation – System for High Throughput Production of Transgenic Events
Heng Zhong, Syngenta Crop Protection, Inc.

Since the first demonstration of successful plant transformation in mid 1980s, significant improvement has been made in the development of transformation technologies. In addition to numerous cell biology innovations and process optimizations made over the past forty years, the evolution of transformation target explants from suspension cultures, to callus cultures, to immature embryos played a critical role in terms of efficiency, throughput, germplasm flexibility and feasibility for automation. However, as genome engineering and editing applications are becoming increasingly complex, trait integration and deployment costs have greatly increased, becoming prohibitive in many cases. Development and optimization of simplified, genotype-flexible transformation/editing systems continues to be a critical means to meet complex plant transformation/editing needs in the future. This session will focus on the development of novel transformation technologies using mature seed embryo as explants, expression of developmental genes and in planta systems to address these issues.

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5:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Granby ABC

SIVB Business Meeting
All members are urged to attend.

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5:45 PM - 9:30 PM

Off Property

A Blooming Good Evening at the Norfolk Botanical Gardens
Admittance by Advance Ticket Holders Only

Wednesday, June 14

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7:00 AM - 12:30 PM

4TH FLOOR REGISTRATION

Registration

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8:00 AM - 10:00 AM

PLENARY SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

Frontiers in Spatial and Single Cell Genomics*

Conveners: William Gordon-Kamm, Corteva Agriscience, Todd Jones, Corteva Agriscience, and Debora Esposito, North Carolina State University

8:00 Introduction (W. Gordon-Kamm, T. Jones, and D. Esposito)
8:05 PS-10

Single-cell Analysis of Plant Shoot Meristems Opens a ‘Goldmine’ for Functional Studies
Xiaosa “Jack” Xu, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

8:40 PS-11

Space – the Final Frontier: The Road to Mapping Transcriptomes in 3D
Kevin Cox, Jr., Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

9:15 PS-12 TBD
9:50 Discussion

Working with cell/tissue cultures within a tightly controlled environment sounds simple. However, as every in vitro biologist knows, growth and morphogenic responses are complex, making genetic and/or epigenetic studies difficult to interpret. As an adjunct to whole tissue RNA sequencing analysis, single-cell RNA-sequencing and spatial transcriptomics technologies enable the study of high-resolution transcriptional activity as an aide in illuminating patterns otherwise masked by whole-tissue complexity. Such techniques have been pioneered in mammalian research but are increasingly being used effectively in plant research. Examples of single-cell and spatial transcriptome analysis will be provided illustrating the advantages of increased spatial resolution in understanding gene expression.

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10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

MAIN SALONS FOYER

Coffee Break

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

GRANBY SALONS DE

Biotransformation, Open Cell Systems and Use of Cell Cultures

Conveners: J. Pon Samuel, Corteva Agriscience, Jeff Beringer, Inari Agriculture, and Lori Marcum, Corteva Agrisciences

10:30 Introduction (J. P. Samuel, J. Beringer, and L. Marcum)
10:35 P-35 Bioprocessing and Plant Cell Culture Technology for Mass Production of Essential Metabolites
Rakhi Chaturvedi, Indian Institute of Technology
11:10 P-36 Plant-derived Cell-free Biofactories for the Production of Secondary Metabolite
Stefan Schillberg, Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME
11:45 P-37 ALiCE®: Simple Reaction – Radical Results; Cell-free Protein Production Scaled According to Customer’s Needs
Ricarda Finnern, LenioBio

Biotransformation is chemical reactions catalyzed by cells, organs, or enzymes and represent an area of biotechnology that has received considerable attention. The use of biotransformation with in vitro plant cell culture and open cell systems has immense potential to produce compounds with a commercial interest and pathway engineering, especially considering the vast biochemical capability for producing secondary metabolites from plant sources. This symposium will highlight the application of different plant cells culture systems, such as intact cell suspensions and open cell suspension, enabling the systems in vitro for advanced applications.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

PLANT SYMPOSIUM

MAIN SALONS EFGH

New Breeding Technologies and Traditional Technologies for Woody Species/Horticultural/ Ornamental Species*

Conveners: Jon Mahoney, Ball Horticultural Company, and Anthony Nwangwu, Duarte Nursery

10:30 Introduction (J. Mahoney and A. Nwangwu)
10:35 P-38 Using Rapid Cycle Breeding Systems to Facilitate Biotech and Traditional Cultivar Development in Woody Crops
Chris Dardick, USDA
11:10 P-39 Polyploidy and Its Importance in Crop Improvement
Jiping Zhao, Ball Horticultural Company
11:45 P-40 Biotechnology of Woody Ornamental Plants
Hui Duan, USDA
12:20 Discussion

 

Improvement of ornamental and horticultural crops by traditional plant breeding techniques has several limitations mainly caused by their high degree of heterozygosity, the length of their juvenile phase, incompatibility, and adaptation to the changing climate. On the other hand, crop improvement by new breeding technologies employs precision breeding tools and techniques to overcome some of the challenges encountered by traditional breeding. It’s now possible to precisely make gene specific modifications to express or suppress desired and undesired traits in a record time. This session will explore the impact of both traditional and emerging breeding technologies on accelerating breeding of woody, horticultural and ornamental species of commercial interest. Guest speakers with years of experience in content and practice of breeding technologies will share their experiences and address any question(s) from the audience during the session.

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10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

ANIMAL SYMPOSIUM

PAUL D. FRAIM

Photobiomodulation: Breakthroughs in Mammalian Applications

Convener: Mae Ciancio, Midwestern University

10:30 A-18 In Vitro Photobiomodulation (PBM) Experiments to Elucidate the Mechanistic Basis of PBM Therapy and to Optimize and Translate Parameters for Effective In Vivo Mammalian Application
Juanita Anders
Uniformed Services University
11:20 A-19 Photobiomodulation:  Breakthroughs in Mammalian Applications
Praveen R. Arany
, University at Buffalo
11:55 A-20 Rejuvenation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Photobiomodulation
Ali Eroglu, Augusta University

 

Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT), also known as low laser light therapy, is a non-invasive technique that incorporates the use of red or infrared light. PBMT has significant health benefits, including pain reduction, wound healing,  and preventing cell death. Outcomes from PBMT are tissue specific as well as dependent on the wavelength and total energy applied.  New applications of PBMT are being uncovered and incorporated as single or adjuvant therapy.  This session will enlighten the audience with cutting-edge discoveries by leading experts on the successful application of PBMT in mammalian systems.

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12:45 PM - 4:30 PM

Off Property

Wednesday Afternoon Scientific Tour: From Electric Fields to the Stars at ODU
Admittance by Advance Ticket Holders Only